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I'm new to Objective-c. For learning purposes I'm trying to build something like a phonebook. So I'll have a class called Person that will have some properties (name, phone, etc).

Right now I'm not preoccupied about persistence. But, I need something to "hold" Person objects. So I thought about create a class called People, but I don't know how to design it, specially the NSMutableArray that will hold the objects.

What I did was:

PERSON.H

@interface Person : NSObject {
   NSString *name;
}
@property(readwrite, copy) NSString *name;
@end

PERSON.M

@implementation Person
@synthesize name;
@end

PEOPLE.H

@interface People : NSObject {
   NSMutableArray *peopleArray;
}
@property(readwrite, retain) NSMutableArray *peopleArray;
- (void)addPerson:(Person *)objPerson;
@end

PEOPLE.M

@implementation People
@synthesize peopleArray;
- (id)init {
   if (![super init]) {
      return nil;
   }
   peopleArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] retain];
   return self;
}
- (void)addPerson:(Person *)objPerson {
   [peopleArray addObject:objPerson];
}

PHONEBOOK.M

...
Person *pOne = [[Person alloc] init];
pOne.name =@"JaneDoe";

People *people = [[People alloc] init];
[people addPerson:pOne];

When I try to use this code, I receive an error:_method sent to an uninitialized mutable array object.

So, since I'm a newbie, probably the way that I did isn't the best/correct one. So, how do I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Two things wrong with your initialiser for people. It should look more like this:

- (id)init {
   self = [super init];   // always assign the result of [super init] to self.
   if (!self) {
      return nil;
   }
   peopleArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];  // use init not retain.
   return self;
}
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you should call [self release] before returning nil, otherwise you will be leaking a memory alloc'ed for a Person object. [Person alloc] makes a room in memory for storing an object. [[...] init] returns initialized object. If init returns nil then the Person *var will be nil and you will be unable to release it later because you will be sending a release to nil. –  Centurion Dec 11 '11 at 12:31
    
@Centurion: The only time the above piece of code returns nil is if [super init] returned nil. In this case, there's nothing to release. I could have put a check in to make sure if peopleArray was nil, I also returned nil, in which case [self release] would be appropriate. –  JeremyP Dec 12 '11 at 11:13
    
I had this situation, and I needed to call [self release] before returning nil'ly self. You can try yourself: a) create a single view application project; b) add new class file c) override the initializer of that class by putting your code, and assign self = nil after self = [super init]; d) add YourClass *c = [[YourClass alloc] init] and [c release] in your root view controller viewDidLoad method. Run profiler with instrument leaks and you will see you are leaking a memory. –  Centurion Dec 14 '11 at 9:24
    
@Centurion: But in your example [super init] does not return nil. The code in my answer only returns nil if [super init] returns nil. –  JeremyP Dec 14 '11 at 15:18
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Because you're not calling init on the NSMutableArray when you create your peopleArray. Try calling:

peopleArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

instead. You need not retain it unless you say for instance, did this:

peopleArray = [[NSMutableArray array] retain];

For reasons why, see the rules for memory management. These rules are very important for any iPhone or Mac developer to understand, and quite frankly, are simple enough that there's no excuse. :)

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In People.m you probably meant to write

peopleArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

instead of

peopleArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] retain];
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