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here is very simplified code of problem I have:

enum node_type {
    t_int, t_double
};

struct int_node {
    int value;
};

struct double_node {
    double value;
};

struct node {
    enum node_type type;
    union {
        struct int_node int_n;
        struct double_node double_n;
    };
};

int main(void) {
    struct int_node i;
    i.value = 10;
    struct node n;
    n.type = t_int;
    n.int_n = i;
    return 0;
}

And what I don't undestand is this:

$ cc us.c 
$ cc -std=c99 us.c 
us.c:18:4: warning: declaration does not declare anything
us.c: In function ‘main’:
us.c:26:4: error: ‘struct node’ has no member named ‘int_n’

Using GCC without -std option compiles code above without any problems (and the similar code is working pretty well), but it seems that c99 does not permit this technique. Why is it so and is it possible to make is c99 (or c89, c90) compatible? Thanks.

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Just a note, clang compiles given code with and without -std=c99 silently, without any errors and warnings. –  Martin Jul 12 '10 at 11:58
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6 Answers

Anonymous unions are a GNU extension, not part of any standard version of the C language. You can use -std=gnu99 or something like that for c99+GNU extensions, but it's best to write proper C and not rely on extensions which provide nothing but syntactic sugar...

Edit: Anonymous unions were added in C11, so they are now a standard part of the language. Presumably GCC's -std=c11 lets you use them.

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3  
Care to give a reason for the -1? I think I answered the question completely with the first sentence and a half... –  R.. Jul 12 '10 at 12:00
4  
This answer is outdated, anonymous unions are now part of C11. –  jpa Nov 10 '12 at 20:42
4  
Thanks. Updated. –  R.. Nov 10 '12 at 21:50
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I'm finding this question about a year and a half after everybody else did, so I can give a different answer: anonymous structs are not in the C99 standard, but they are in the C11 standard. GCC and clang already support this (the C11 standard seems to have lifted the feature from Microsoft, and GCC has provided support for some MSFT extensions for some time).

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1  
Nice to know. Thanks for the update :-) –  Martin Feb 10 '12 at 10:55
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Union must have a name and be declared like this:

union UPair {
    struct int_node int_n;
    struct double_node double_n;
};

UPair X;
X.int_n.value = 12;
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Thanks, this lead me to solution. –  Martin Jul 12 '10 at 11:49
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Well, the solution was to name instance of the union (which can remain anonymous as datatype) and then use that name as a proxy.

$ diff -u old_us.c us.c 
--- old_us.c    2010-07-12 13:49:25.000000000 +0200
+++ us.c        2010-07-12 13:49:02.000000000 +0200
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@
   union {
     struct int_node int_n;
     struct double_node double_n;
-  };
+  } data;
 };

 int main(void) {
@@ -23,6 +23,6 @@
   i.value = 10;
   struct node n;
   n.type = t_int;
-  n.int_n = i;
+  n.data.int_n = i;
   return 0;
 }

Now it compiles as c99 without any problems.

$ cc -std=c99 us.c 
$ 

Note: I am not happy about this solution anyway.

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2  
You should be happy! It's the Standard way to access union members, guaranteed to work with any C compiler since Jan 1st 1970. –  Jens Aug 23 '12 at 7:11
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Looking at 6.2.7.1 of C99, I'm seeing that the identifier is optional:

           struct-or-union-specifier:
                   struct-or-union identifier-opt { struct-declaration-list }
                   struct-or-union identifier

           struct-or-union:
                   struct
                   union

           struct-declaration-list:
                   struct-declaration
                   struct-declaration-list struct-declaration

           struct-declaration:
                   specifier-qualifier-list struct-declarator-list ;

           specifier-qualifier-list:
                   type-specifier specifier-qualifier-list-opt
                   type-qualifier specifier-qualifier-list-opt

I've been up and down searching, and cannot find any reference to anonymous unions being against the spec. The whole -opt suffix indicates that the thing, in this case identifier is optional according to 6.1.

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Thanks for your interest –  Martin Jul 12 '10 at 11:56
3  
I think there's a misunderstanding here. The identifier for a struct or union tag is optional, but not the identifier that's being declared. You can't say union { ... }; within some aggregate for the same reason you can't say int;. In the union case, compiler extensions allow it, because you can use identifiers in the {...} part when using an anonymous union. –  Jens Aug 22 '12 at 8:39
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Another solution is to put the common header value (enum node_type type) into every structure, and make your top-level structure a union. It's not exactly "Don't Repeat Yourself", but it does avoid both anonymous unions and uncomfortable looking proxy values.

enum node_type {
    t_int, t_double
};
struct int_node {
    enum node_type type;
    int value;
};
struct double_node {
    enum node_type type;
    double value;
};
union node {
    enum node_type type;
    struct int_node int_n;
    struct double_node double_n;
};

int main(void) {
    union node n;
    n.type = t_int; // or n.int_n.type = t_int;
    n.int_n.value = 10;
    return 0;
}
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