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I've been using the following data structure for the representation of propositional logic in Haskell:

data Prop 
    = Pred  String
    | Not   Prop
    | And   Prop Prop
    | Or    Prop Prop
    | Impl  Prop Prop
    | Equiv Prop Prop
    deriving (Eq, Ord)

Any comments on this structure are welcome.

However, now I want to extend my algoritms to handle FOL - predicate logic. What would be a good way of representing FOL in Haskell?

I've seen versions that are - pretty much - an extension of the above, and versions that are based on more classic context-free grammars. Is there any literature on this, that could be recommended?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 21 down vote accepted

This is known as higher-order abstract syntax.

First solution: Use Haskell's lambda. A datatype could look like:

data Prop 
    = Not   Prop
    | And   Prop Prop
    | Or    Prop Prop
    | Impl  Prop Prop
    | Equiv Prop Prop
    | Equals Obj Obj
    | ForAll (Obj -> Prop)
    | Exists (Obj -> Prop)
    deriving (Eq, Ord)

data Obj
    = Num Integer
    | Add Obj Obj
    | Mul Obj Obj
    deriving (Eq, Ord)

You can write a formula as:

ForAll (\x -> Exists (\y -> Equals (Add x y) (Mul x y))))

This is described in detail in in The Monad Reader article. Highly recommended.

Second solution:

Use strings like

data Prop 
    = Not   Prop
    | And   Prop Prop
    | Or    Prop Prop
    | Impl  Prop Prop
    | Equiv Prop Prop
    | Equals Obj Obj
    | ForAll String Prop
    | Exists String Prop
    deriving (Eq, Ord)

data Obj
    = Num Integer
    | Var String
    | Add Obj Obj
    | Mul Obj Obj
    deriving (Eq, Ord)

Then you can write a formula like

ForAll "x" (Exists "y" (Equals (Add (Var "x") (Var "y")))
                               (Mul (Var "x") (Var "y"))))))

The advantage is that you can show the formula easily (it's hard to show a Obj -> Prop function). The disadvantage is that you have to write changing names on collision (~alpha conversion) and substitution (~beta conversion). In both solutions, you can use GADT instead of two datatypes:

 data FOL a where
    True :: FOL Bool
    False :: FOL Bool
    Not :: FOL Bool -> FOL Bool
    And :: FOL Bool -> FOL Bool -> FOL Bool
    ...
     -- first solution
    Exists :: (FOL Integer -> FOL Bool) -> FOL Bool
    ForAll :: (FOL Integer -> FOL Bool) -> FOL Bool
    -- second solution
    Exists :: String -> FOL Bool -> FOL Bool
    ForAll :: String -> FOL Bool -> FOL Bool
    Var :: String -> FOL Integer
    -- operations in the universe
    Num :: Integer -> FOL Integer
    Add :: FOL Integer -> FOL Integer -> FOL Integer
    ...

Third solution: Use numerals to represent where the variable is bound, where lower means deeper. For example, in ForAll (Exists (Equals (Num 0) (Num 1))) the first variable will bind to Exists, and second to ForAll. This is known as de Bruijn numerals. See I am not a number - I am a free variable.

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I guess I have some reading to do.. thank you! I'll get back here after I finish the articles. –  pepijn Jul 12 '10 at 15:27
    
Just nitpicking, but it's still alpha conversion, even if it happens at substitution time. –  finrod Jul 12 '10 at 21:52
    
I believe the term "Higher-order abstract syntax" applies only to the first solution. Your answer seems to say the problem itself (or all three solutions) is known as HOAS. –  Alexey Romanov Jul 12 '10 at 22:53

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