Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an iterator of lines from a very large file that need to be put in groups as I move along. I know where each group ends because there is a sentinel value on the last line of each group. So basically I want to write a function that takes an iterator and a sentinel value, and returns an iterator of groups each terminated by the sentinel value. Something like:

scala> groups("abc.defg.hi.jklmn.".iterator, '.')
res1: Iterator[Seq[Char]] = non-empty iterator

scala> groups("abc.defg.hi.jklmn.".iterator, '.').toList
res19: List[Seq[Char]] = List(List(a, b, c, .), List(d, e, f, g, .), List(h, i, .), List(j, k, l, m, n, .))

Note that I want the sentinel items included at the end of each of the groups. Here's my current solution:

def groups[T](iter: Iterator[T], sentinel: T) = new Iterator[Seq[T]] {                   
  def hasNext = iter.hasNext
  def next = iter.takeWhile(_ != sentinel).toList ++ List(sentinel)
}

I think this will work, and I guess it is fine, but having to re-add the sentinel every time gives me a code smell. Is there a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Did you want a sentinel added to the last group if it didn't contain it? (e.g "abc.def" -> ["abc.","def."]) –  Mitch Blevins Jul 12 '10 at 19:48
    
Ideally no, though practically I think it doesn't matter. –  Steve Jul 12 '10 at 20:37
    
It so happens that I have wanted, and asked for, a takeTo (plus dropTo and spanTo), which would act just like takeWhile, but return one more element -- the first one for which the predicate is true. If you feel like me, you could drop a note here: lampsvn.epfl.ch/trac/scala/ticket/2963 –  Daniel C. Sobral Jul 13 '10 at 2:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ugly, but should be more performant than your solution:

  def groups[T](iter: Iterator[T], sentinel: T) = new Iterator[Seq[T]] {                   
    def hasNext = iter.hasNext
    def next = iter.takeWhile{
      var last = null.asInstanceOf[T]
       c => { val temp = last; last = c; temp != sentinel}
     }.toList
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's ugly, but cool. =) You can move the "var last" out to a private variable, and then it looks a little less ugly. –  Steve Jul 13 '10 at 15:28

Less readable than yours, but more "correct" when final group doesn't have a terminating sentinel value:

def groups[T](iter: Iterator[T], sentinel: T) = new Iterator[Seq[T]] {
 def hasNext = iter.hasNext
 def next: Seq[T] = {
     val builder = scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer[T]()
     while (iter.hasNext) {
       val x = iter.next
       builder.append(x)
       if (x == sentinel) return builder
     }
     builder
 }
}

Or, recursively:

  def groups[T](iter: Iterator[T], sentinel: T) = new Iterator[Seq[T]] {
    def hasNext = iter.hasNext
    def next: Seq[T] = {
      @scala.annotation.tailrec
      def build(accumulator: ListBuffer[T]): Seq[T] = {
        val v = iter.next
        accumulator.append(v)
        if (v == sentinel || !iter.hasNext) => accumulator
        else build(accumulator)
      }
      build(new ListBuffer[T]())
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.