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Right now I have this code which enumerates to a singe column table all the way down the page.

Is there a way to make it two colums next to each other all the way to the end?

 <table>
<% foreach (var item in Model)
   { %>
   <tr>
        <td>
          <%=Html.Encode(item.PartNo)%>
       </td>
   </tr>

<% } %>

</table>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can just change the foreach loop to a for loop for more flexibility:

<% var itemList = Model.ToList(); %>

<table>
<% for (int i=0; i <= itemList.Count; i+=2))
   { %>
   <tr>
        <td>
          <%= Html.Encode(itemList[i].PartNo) %>
       </td>
       <td>
          <% if (i+1 < itemList.Count) 
             { 
                 Response.Write(Html.Encode(itemList[i+1].PartNo));
             }
           %>
       </td>
   </tr>
<% } %>
</table>

If you're doing this a lot, you could consider turning it into an HTML helper to output any number of columns.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes, thank you! I get in the habit of using a foreach and forget about using anything else!! Thanks! –  riverdayz Jul 12 '10 at 19:14
    
I get an error on the i<= Model.Count saying operator <= cannot be applied to opperands of type int and method group –  riverdayz Jul 12 '10 at 19:18
    
It should be Model.Count() –  rtalbot Jul 12 '10 at 19:22
    
ok fixed that now I get an error on the <%=Html.Encode(Model[i].PartNo) %>" saying cannot apply indexing to an expression of type System.Collections.Generic.IENumerable<Item> –  riverdayz Jul 12 '10 at 19:25
    
@riverdayz - you'll need to convert your IEnumerable to a List in order to use indexes and Count on it. I've updated my code for you. –  womp Jul 12 '10 at 19:47

Building off of womp's answer, here's an example (untested!) that works using an enumerator and can display an arbitrary number of columns. This may address some of the issues you're mentioning as well.

<table><% 
    int numberOfColumns = 2;
    var enumerator = Model.GetEnumerator();
    bool endOfEnumerator = !enumerator.MoveNext();

    while(!endOfEnumerator)
    {   %>
    <tr><%
        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfColumns; i++)
        { %>
        <td>
            <%= Html.Encode(enumerator.Current.PartNo) %>
        </td><%
            if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                endOfEnumerator = true;
                break;
            }
        } %>
    </tr><%
    } %>
</table>
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If you're just looking for an extra column, you can keep the foreach and just add a <td></td>:

<table> 
<% foreach (var item in Model) 
   { %> 
   <tr> 
        <td> 
          <%=Html.Encode(item.PartNo)%> 
       </td> 
       <td>
         <%=Html.Encode(item.NextPartNo)%> 
       </td>
   </tr> 

<% } %> 

share|improve this answer
    
the extra column needs to have the next item.partno in it. not just a blank column –  riverdayz Jul 12 '10 at 19:28
    
you should add this additional requirement to the question then –  rtalbot Jul 12 '10 at 19:37
    
others have understood just fine thanks –  riverdayz Jul 12 '10 at 20:11
    
well womp did (good job womp!). all the rest of the answers in this thread are doing something different - which is a pretty good argument for providing clarification to the question but whatever. –  rtalbot Jul 12 '10 at 20:54

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