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Is there any particular reason why chrome does not respect "display:inline" when it's used on "<table>" and is there a known workaround? Everything works fine in firefox but for some reason chrome refuses to do the right thing when I type

<table style="display:inline;">
    table stuff
</table>

firefox alignment: firefox alignment

chrome alignment: chrome alignment

Both versions use the same html source that sets the display property to inline. The tables individually are not wrapped inside any other div and they are all enclosed inside one big div. Here's the pastie for the relevant part of the html.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To pull of what you're after, you just need to add this to every td:

<td valign="top">

That will force everything to the top of each cell and will force things to display inline, how you want them to. No CSS needed here.

It SHOULD be coded like this:

<table>
 <tr>
  <td valign="top">item 1 info</td>
  <td valign="top">item 2 info</td>
  <td valign="top">item 3 info</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td valign="top">item 4 info</td>
  <td valign="top">item 5 info</td>
  <td valign="top">item 6 info</td>
 </tr>
</table>

edit: Or if (for some reason) you're not using TR and TD's you can try this:

<table style="vertical-align:top;">
    table stuff
</table>
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Thanks dude. That did the trick. Now it displays the same way in chrome and firefox. I'm not even gonna bother with IE. –  davidk01 Jul 13 '10 at 8:15
    
i had that in my comments 16 mins ago :p –  meder Jul 13 '10 at 8:15
    
@meder - you just listed some vague comment about vertical-align which applies to at least three different elements in the table. @Tim actually listed the exact code that did the trick that's why I accepted his answer. –  davidk01 Jul 13 '10 at 8:20
    
lol :P I suppose the difference is that I had an example... –  Tim Jul 13 '10 at 8:20
    
ok sorry, i assumed you knew what common elements to apply it to, and assumed you could test it out fairly quick. i hope you arent actually using the attribute though. –  meder Jul 13 '10 at 8:23

Why on earth would you set a table element to be inline? It should be a display of table. User error IMO.

You'd have to alter the display mode of all the tr and td elements inside otherwise they will improperly render, most likely.

If you need the table to be in the same line as another element, wrap a div around the table and float it. Don't mess with the table.

EDIT: As I specified per my last comment, you should mess with vertical-align and probably set it to top on the tables.

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2  
Of course, this is the only sensible answer. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Jul 13 '10 at 7:06
    
What do you mean why? Because sometimes you want tables to stack next to each other instead of piling up one on top of the other. How is that a user error? –  davidk01 Jul 13 '10 at 7:13
    
@davidk01 - read the last part of my answer. –  meder Jul 13 '10 at 7:30
    
@meder - I did and maybe I'm missing something but the alignment is still off. All the tables are aligned with the last row, so if one of the tables is too tall then it sticks out. I want them to align with the top row so even if the tables are uneven their tops are aligned. –  davidk01 Jul 13 '10 at 7:41
    
@meder - firefox has no problem with this and cheerfully does as I tell it to and aligns all the tables with their top rows. –  davidk01 Jul 13 '10 at 7:42

css 2.1 defines inline-table. No idea how widely supported it is, but it sounds like that might be what you're looking for.

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/tables.html#table-display

Although from your screenshot, it looks like what you really want is control over vertical alignment.

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Browser support information, w3schools.com/cssref/pr_class_display.asp –  James McMahon Aug 15 '11 at 18:46

Try inline-block.

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Surely this is the correct answer? Works like a dream, and is more semantic than 'vertical-align:top'? –  Hogsmill Jul 23 '11 at 7:11

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