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I haven't played with CSS for too long a time and am without references at the moment. My question should be fairly easy but googling isn't bringing up a sufficient answer. So, adding to the collective knowledge...

|#header---------------------------------------------------------------|
|                               TITLE                                  |
|#sub-title------------------------------------------------------------|
|bread > crumb                    |                  username logout   |
|#sub-left                        |                          #sub-right|
|---------------------------------|------------------------------------|

That's what I'm wanting my layout to be. The heading anyways. I wanted sub-title to contain sub-left AND sub-right. What css rules do I use to ensure a div is bound by the attributes of another div. In this case, how do I ensure that sub-left and sub-right stay within sub-title?

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13 Answers 13

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Its quite a common misconception that you need a clear:both div at the bottom when you really don't. While foxy's answer is correct, you don't need that unsemantic, useless clearing div. All you need to do is stick an overflow:hidden onto the containing div like so:

#sub-title { overflow:hidden; }
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3  
Thank you very much! I remember chasing this problem down around 2 years ago and now I remember using overflow:hidden. I'll try this as soon as I get back to my laptop and make this the correct answer. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 28 '08 at 2:52
    
Not a problem, let me know how it pans out –  Darko Z Nov 28 '08 at 3:40
4  
"Common misconception" is a bit harsh, since a clearing div is the w3c recommended method, but this is a neat trick. For more on that, see quirksmode.org/css/clearing.html –  itsadok Jun 16 '09 at 6:24
1  
the common misconception is that you need a clearing div, not that its wrong or wont work or isn't recommended. personally i think it shouldn't be recommended as its unsemantic (though i have used it before when no other way was available) –  Darko Z Jun 17 '09 at 7:56

Something like this perhaps...

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            #container
            {
                width:600px;
            }

            #head, #sub-title
            {
                width:100%;
            }

            #sub-left, #sub-right
            {
                width:50%;
                float:left;
            }

        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id="container">
            <div id="head">
                 #head
            </div>
            <div id="sub-title">
                #sub-title
                <div id="sub-left">
                    #sub-left
                </div>

                <div id="sub-right">
                    #sub-right
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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That's very similar to what I'm currently using. However, say I wanted the 'container' in your example to draw a border around the sub-left and sub-right divs, it won't work. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 27 '08 at 12:40

Or if you want to ditch older browsers, try css tables.

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This should do what you are looking for:

<html>
	<head>
		<style type="text/css">
			#header {
				text-align: center;
			}
			#wrapper {
				margin:0 auto;
				width:600px;
			}
			#submain {
				margin:0 auto;
				width:600px;
			}
			#sub-left {
				float:left;
				width:300px;
			}
			#sub-right {
				float:right;
				width:240px;
				text-align: right;
			}
		</style>

	</head>
	<body>
		<div id="wrapper">
			<div id="header"><h1>Head</h1></div>
			<div id="sub-main">
				<div id="sub-left">
					Right
				</div>
				<div id="sub-right">
					Left
				</div>
			</div>
		</div>
	</body>
</html>

And you can control the entire document with the wrapper class, or just the two columns with the sub-main class.

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You can also achieve this using a CSS Grids framework, such as YUI Grids or Blue Print CSS. They solve alot of the cross browser issues and make more sophisticated column layouts possible for use mere mortals.

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When you float sub-left and sub-right they no longer take up any space within sub-title. You need to add another div with style = "clear: both" beneath them to expand the containing div or they appear below it.

HTML:

<div id="sub-title">
   <div id="sub-left">
      sub-left
   </div>
   <div id="sub-right">
      sub-right
   </div>
   <div class="clear-both"></div>
</div>

CSS:

#sub-left {
   float: left;
}
#sub-right {
   float: right;
}
.clear-both {
   clear: both;
}
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Seriously try some of these, you can choose fixed width or more fluid layouts, the choice is yours! Really easy to implement too.

IronMyers Layouts

more more more

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This answer adds to the solutions above to address your last sentence that reads:

how do I ensure that sub-left and sub-right stay within sub-title

The problem is that as the content of sub-left or sub-right expands they will extend below sub-title. This behaviour is designed into CSS but does cause problems for most of us. The easiest solution is to have a div that is styled with the CSS Clear declaration.

To do this include a CSS statement to define a closing div (can be Clear Left or RIght rather than both, depending on what Float declarations have been used:

#sub_close {clear:both;}

And the HTML becomes:

<div id="sub-title">
<div id="sub-left">Right</div>
<div id="sub-right">Left</div>
<div id="sub-close"></div>
</div>

Sorry, just realized this was posted previously, shouldn't have made that cup of coffee while typing my reply!

@Darko Z: you are right, the best description for the overflow:auto (or overflow:hidden) solution that I have found was in a a post on SitePoint a while ago Simple Clearing of FLoats and there is also a good description in a 456bereastreet article CSS Tips and Tricks Part-2. Have to admit to being too lazy to implement these solutions myself, as the closing div cludge works OK although it is of course very inelegant. So will make an effort from now on to clean up my act.

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I agree with Darko Z on applying "overflow: hidden" to #sub-title. However, it should be mentioned that the overflow:hidden method of clearing floats does not work with IE6 unless you have a specified width or height. Or, if you don't want to specify a width or height, you can use "zoom: 1":

#sub-title { overflow:hidden; zoom: 1; }
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You do it like this:

<table>
   <tr>
      <td colspan="2">TITLE</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>subleft</td><td>subright</td>
   </tr>
</table>

EASY - took me 1 minute to type it. Remember the CSS file needs to be downloaded to the client, so don't worry about the waffle about extra tags, its irrelavent in this instance.

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the request is to provide information on how to use div –  user2601995 Aug 30 '13 at 18:48

Instead of using overflow:hidden, which is a kind of hack, why not simply setting a fixed height, e.g. height:500px, to the parent division?

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Best and simple approach with css3

#subtitle{
/*for webkit browsers*/
     display:-webkit-box;
    -webkit-box-align:center;
    -webkit-box-pack: center;
     width:100%;
}

#subleft,#subright{
     width:50%;
}
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#sub-left, #sub-right
{
    display: inline-block;
}
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