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I'm a experienced .NET developer, but I havent done much webdevelopment and particularly not a new site from scratch.

Now am I thinking of building a site for one of my hobbies. I realize that much of the functionality I need has already been bulit and hopefully released as opensource. My wish is to find a skelletton for my site with the basic functionality to bulid upon. That will leave the specific and fun parts to me....

I wishlist: - One logon for the site. - User profiles. - Possibility for users to contribute with articles, pictures, links etc. - Leave comments for articles. - Generate feeds. - Build the site using ASP.NET MVC

Can anyone point me in the right direction? Where do I start?

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5 Answers

I hesitated writing this answer because it might come across as flippent or deliberately unhelpful.

However, I cannot recommend highly enough the tutorials and examples on the MVC site; especially the NerdDinner example app and walkthrough (not sure if it's been updated for MVC2 though).

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I had a look at nerddinner a long time ago, I will definitely go through this again. –  Erik Z Jul 13 '10 at 10:34
    
My suggestion for this comes from the fact that if you start from a place where you truly understand all of the MVC architecture (and the 150+ page NerdDinner tute will teach you lot), you'll find that all of these things are relatively simple to implement (ND has login etc that you can easily extend). What I haven't found yet is a full-blown CMS for MVC that's high grade. I have been looking at mvccms.codeplex.com although it appears to be in its infancy and therefore might not suit your needs. –  Andras Zoltan Jul 13 '10 at 16:13
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As developer for developers ;) check this http://kigg.codeplex.com/ I think it's exactly what you need. Live sample here dotnetshoutout.com

Enjoy :)

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Hi Malcolm what you need has been implemented many times. If you need to start from scratch for the learning experience I would recommend the ASP.Net MVC Membership Starter Kit (http://mvcmembership.codeplex.com/) it would handle user accounts and profiles for you (read up on ASP.Net membership if you are unfamiliar with it).

If you don't need to start from scratch I would recommend looking at a CMS or blogging system depending on your specific requirements as there is no point in reinventing the wheel unless you really have to or want to learn.

Edit Have a look here:
http://www.microsoft.com/web/gallery/Categories.aspx?category=Blogs
and
http://www.microsoft.com/web/gallery/Categories.aspx?category=ContentMgmt&appid=BlogEngineNET

I am not up to date with MVC blog engines but I know there isn't too many CMS's around that would compete with more mature ASP.Net alternatives.

I hope this is helpful.

Thanks,

B

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Thank you! ASP.Net membership is not new to me, but the project looks interesting for learning.....but this time I look towards a more "finished" solution. Can you recomend a simple(or at least easy to learn) cms/blog system? –  Erik Z Jul 13 '10 at 10:40
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check out http://www.orchardproject.net/. But you may find some liter alternatives for your specific needs. Or you can possibly combine a couple of codeplex projects to get to where you want to be.

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Orchard isn't recommended for production environment yet and until MS give it the production green light I wouldn't recommend it for anything other than a reference. –  Burt Jul 13 '10 at 10:13
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As stated above I would recommend going through the nerd dinner tutorial again. Also the nerd dinner code hosted at codeplex has been updated to Asp.net MVC 2.0, and is a great reference to many of the new features. Burt mentioned the MVC Membership Starter kit (http://mvcmembership.codeplex.com/), I have personally tinkered with this, and it saves hours upon hours of time by automagically implementing authentication and role management built on a standardized db schema easily generated by a tool found in the framework 2.0 files somewhere.

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