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Hi guys can I use Visual Studio 2010 express edition to create a telco-grade applications?

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you can use it to produce whatever your imagination can come up with. –  Mitch Wheat Jul 13 '10 at 11:09
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The quality of any Application is down to your design and programming skills –  Mitch Wheat Jul 13 '10 at 11:09
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Define 'Telco-grade'? If I was to use Telstra as a model, that wouldn't amount to much. –  Mitch Wheat Jul 13 '10 at 11:10
    
I'm not convinced telco-grade means high levels of quality assurance and quality. Atleast not if you take BT –  Chris S Jul 13 '10 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes. You can use a text editor like Vi to create a telco-grade (otherwise known as carrier-grade) application, or even Notepad. Being telco-grade has nothing to do with the tools you use to write the software, but the language/compiler/runtime quality, design methodology, testing regime, etc.

You might find it easier using a full version of Visual Studio if the additional capabilities contribute to code quality.

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Yes we're planning to buy the licensed edition but I'm tasked to take a look at the new IDE and all I have now is the express editions. –  powerbox Jul 13 '10 at 11:20
    
@powerbox - if you are planning to buy, then I'd suggest looking at MSDN subscriptions. You get access to a lot more than just VS, and if you are developing commercial apps those extras are worth it. –  Peter M Jul 13 '10 at 12:39

You can create commercial applications with the Express Editions, no problem. That is allowed in the licencing conditons. But you need to say what's special about telco-grade apps that might lead other considerations.

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There's no strict definition of telco or carrier grade, but it implies that the application will provide a 24/7 service with no required down time (typically provided by redundancy and automatic falover) and high reliability such as five nines or better. –  Simon Hibbs Jul 13 '10 at 11:18

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