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I'd like to return a string from a bash function.

I'll write the example in java to show what I'd like to do:

public String getSomeString() {
  return "tadaa";
}

String variable = getSomeString();

The example below works in bash, but is there a better way to do this?

function getSomeString {
   echo "tadaa"
}

VARIABLE=$(getSomeString)
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13 Answers 13

up vote 83 down vote accepted

There is no better way I know of. Bash knows only status codes (integers) and strings written to the stdout.

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8  
+1 @tomas-f : you have to be really careful on what you have in this function "getSomeString()" as having any code which will eventually echo will mean that you get incorrect return string. –  Mani Sep 14 '12 at 16:38

You could have the function take a variable as the first arg and modify the variable with the string you want to return.

#!/bin/bash
set -x
function pass_back_a_string() {
    eval "$1='foo bar rab oof'"
}

return_var=''
pass_back_a_string return_var
echo $return_var

Prints "foo bar rab oof".

Edit: added quoting in the appropriate place to allow whitespace in string to address @Luca Borrione's comment.

Edit: As a demonstration, see the following program. This is a general-purpose solution: it even allows you to receive a string into a local variable.

#!/bin/bash
set -x
function pass_back_a_string() {
    eval "$1='foo bar rab oof'"
}

return_var=''
pass_back_a_string return_var
echo $return_var

function call_a_string_func() {
     local lvar=''
     pass_back_a_string lvar
     echo "lvar='$lvar' locally"
}

call_a_string_func
echo "lvar='$lvar' globally"

This prints:

+ return_var=
+ pass_back_a_string return_var
+ eval 'return_var='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ return_var='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo foo bar rab oof
foo bar rab oof
+ call_a_string_func
+ local lvar=
+ pass_back_a_string lvar
+ eval 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ lvar='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'' locally'
lvar='foo bar rab oof' locally
+ echo 'lvar='\'''\'' globally'
lvar='' globally

Edit: demonstrating that the original variable's value is available in the function, as was incorrectly criticized by @Xichen Li in a comment.

#!/bin/bash
set -x
function pass_back_a_string() {
    eval "echo in pass_back_a_string, original $1 is \$$1"
    eval "$1='foo bar rab oof'"
}

return_var='original return_var'
pass_back_a_string return_var
echo $return_var

function call_a_string_func() {
     local lvar='original lvar'
     pass_back_a_string lvar
     echo "lvar='$lvar' locally"
}

call_a_string_func
echo "lvar='$lvar' globally"

This gives output:

+ return_var='original return_var'
+ pass_back_a_string return_var
+ eval 'echo in pass_back_a_string, original return_var is $return_var'
++ echo in pass_back_a_string, original return_var is original return_var
in pass_back_a_string, original return_var is original return_var
+ eval 'return_var='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ return_var='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo foo bar rab oof
foo bar rab oof
+ call_a_string_func
+ local 'lvar=original lvar'
+ pass_back_a_string lvar
+ eval 'echo in pass_back_a_string, original lvar is $lvar'
++ echo in pass_back_a_string, original lvar is original lvar
in pass_back_a_string, original lvar is original lvar
+ eval 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'''
++ lvar='foo bar rab oof'
+ echo 'lvar='\''foo bar rab oof'\'' locally'
lvar='foo bar rab oof' locally
+ echo 'lvar='\'''\'' globally'
lvar='' globally
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is great! Parameters can be passed by references, similar to the idea in C++. –  Yun Huang Apr 19 '12 at 6:08
1  
It would be nice to receive a response from an expert about that answer. I've never seen that used in scripts, maybe for a good reason. Anyway: that's +1 It should have been voted for correct answer –  John Apr 19 '12 at 11:46
    
Isn't this the same of fgm answer written in a simplified way? This won't work if the string foo contains white spaces, while the fgm's one will .. as he's showing. –  Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 21:32
    
@LucaBorrione: I think this answer was posted first, and yes, it does appear to be simpler than fgm's answer, which is probably a benefit to the OP. –  bstpierre May 9 '12 at 1:46
3  
@XichenLi: thanks for leaving a comment with your downvote; please see my edit. You can get the initial value of the variable in the function with \$$1. If you are looking for something different, please let me know. –  bstpierre Dec 4 '12 at 16:46

All answers above ignore what has been stated in the man page of bash.

  • All variables declared inside a function will be shared with the calling environment.
  • All variables declared local will not be shared.

Example code

#!/bin/bash

f()
{
    echo function starts
    local WillNotExists="It still does!"
    DoesNotExists="It still does!"
    echo function ends
}

echo $DoesNotExists #Should print empty line
echo $WillNotExists #Should print empty line
f                   #Call the function
echo $DoesNotExists #Should print It still does!
echo $WillNotExists #Should print empty line

And output

$ sh -x ./x.sh
+ echo

+ echo

+ f
+ echo function starts 
function starts
+ local 'WillNotExists=It still does!'
+ DoesNotExists='It still does!'
+ echo function ends 
function ends
+ echo It still 'does!' 
It still does!
+ echo

Also under pdksh and ksh this script does the same!

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6  
You're right that the answers above ignore that, but that has a good reason: it's irrelevant for the question. –  Elmar Zander Mar 20 '12 at 10:10
    
I commented your head up posting an answer –  Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 22:20
4  
This answer does have its merits. I came in here thinking that I wanted to return a string from a function. This answer made me realize that that was just my C#-habits talking. I suspect others may have the same experience. –  LOAS Apr 15 '13 at 7:29
3  
@ElmarZander You're wrong, this is entirely relevant. This is a simple way to get into global scope a function-scope value, and some would consider this better/simpler than the eval approach to redefine a global variable as outlined by bstpierre. –  KomodoDave May 17 '13 at 12:32
    
local is not portable to non-bash scripts which is one reason some people avoid it. –  don bright Mar 22 at 16:05

Like bstpierre above, I use and recommend the use of explicitly naming output variables:

function some_func() # OUTVAR ARG1
{
   local _outvar=$1
   local _result # Use some naming convention to avoid OUTVARs to clash
   ... some processing ....
   eval $_outvar=\$_result # Instead of just =$_result
}

Note the use of quoting the $. This will avoid interpreting content in $result as shell special characters. I have found that this is an order of magnitude faster than the result=$(some_func "arg1") idiom of capturing an echo. The speed difference seems even more notable using bash on MSYS where stdout capturing from function calls is almost catastrophic.

It's ok to send in a local variables since locals are dynamically scoped in bash:

function another_func() # ARG
{
   local result
   some_func result "$1"
   echo result is $result
}
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You could use a global variable:

declare globalvar='some string'

string ()
{
  eval  "$1='some other string'"
} # ----------  end of function string  ----------

string globalvar

echo "'${globalvar}'"

This gives

'some other string'
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You could also capture the function output:

#!/bin/bash
function getSomeString() {
     echo "tadaa!"
}

return_var=$(getSomeString)
echo $return_var
# Alternative syntax:
return_var=`getSomeString`
echo $return_var

Looks weird, but is better than using global variables IMHO. Passing parameters works as usual, just put them inside the braces or backticks.

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2  
apart from the alternative syntax note, isn't this the exact same thing the op already wrote in his own question? –  Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 21:43

The most straightforward and robust solution is to use command substitution, as other people wrote:

assign()
{
    local x
    x="Test"
    echo "$x"
}

x=$(assign) # This assigns string "Test" to x

The downside is performance as this requires a separate process.

The other technique suggested in this topic, namely passing the name of a variable to assign to as an argument, has side effects, and I wouldn't recommend it in its basic form. The problem is that you will probably need some variables in the function to calculate the return value, and it may happen that the name of the variable intended to store the return value will interfere with one of them:

assign()
{
    local x
    x="Test"
    eval "$1=\$x"
}

assign y # This assigns string "Test" to y, as expected

assign x # This will NOT assign anything to x in this scope
         # because the name "x" is declared as local inside the function

You might, of course, not declare internal variables of the function as local, but you really should always do it as otherwise you may, on the other hand, accidentally overwrite an unrelated variable from the parent scope if there is one with the same name.

One possible workaround is an explicit declaration of the passed variable as global:

assign()
{
    local x
    eval declare -g $1
    x="Test"
    eval "$1=\$x"
}

If name "x" is passed as an argument, the second row of the function body will overwrite the previous local declaration. But the names themselves might still interfere, so if you intend to use the value previously stored in the passed variable prior to write the return value there, be aware that you must copy it into another local variable at the very beginning; otherwise the result will be unpredictable! Besides, this will only work in the most recent version of BASH, namely 4.2. More portable code might utilize explicit conditional constructs with the same effect:

assign()
{
    if [[ $1 != x ]]; then
      local x
    fi
    x="Test"
    eval "$1=\$x"
}

Perhaps the most elegant solution is just to reserve one global name for function return values and use it consistently in every function you write.

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The way you have it is the only way to do this without breaking scope. Bash doesn't have a concept of return types, just exit codes and file descriptors (stdin/out/err, etc)

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Addressing Vicky Ronnen's head up, considering the following code:

function use_global
{
    eval "$1='changed using a global var'"
}

function capture_output
{
    echo "always changed"
}

function test_inside_a_func
{
    local _myvar='local starting value'
    echo "3. $_myvar"

    use_global '_myvar'
    echo "4. $_myvar"

    _myvar=$( capture_output )
    echo "5. $_myvar"
}

function only_difference
{
    local _myvar='local starting value'
    echo "7. $_myvar"

    local use_global '_myvar'
    echo "8. $_myvar"

    local _myvar=$( capture_output )
    echo "9. $_myvar"
}

declare myvar='global starting value'
echo "0. $myvar"

use_global 'myvar'
echo "1. $myvar"

myvar=$( capture_output )
echo "2. $myvar"

test_inside_a_func
echo "6. $_myvar" # this was local inside the above function

only_difference



will give

0. global starting value
1. changed using a global var
2. always changed
3. local starting value
4. changed using a global var
5. always changed
6. 
7. local starting value
8. local starting value
9. always changed

Maybe the normal scenario is to use the syntax used in the test_inside_a_func function, thus you can use both methods in the majority of cases, although capturing the output is the safer method always working in any situation, mimicking the returning value from a function that you can find in other languages, as Vicky Ronnen correctly pointed out.

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To illustrate my comment on Andy's answer, with additional file descriptor manipulation to avoid use of /dev/tty:

#!/bin/bash

exec 3>&1

returnString() {
    exec 4>&1 >&3
    local s=$1
    s=${s:="some default string"}
    echo "writing to stdout"
    echo "writing to stderr" >&2
    exec >&4-
    echo "$s"
}

my_string=$(returnString "$*")
echo "my_string:  [$my_string]"

Still nasty, though.

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As previously mentioned, the "correct" way to return a string from a function is with command substitution. In the event that the function also needs to output to console (as @Mani mentions above), create a temporary fd in the beginning of the function and redirect to console. Close the temporary fd before returning your string.

#!/bin/bash
# file:  func_return_test.sh
returnString() {
    exec 3>&1 >/dev/tty
    local s=$1
    s=${s:="some default string"}
    echo "writing directly to console"
    exec >&3-
    echo "$s"
}

my_string=$(returnString "$*")
echo "my_string:  [$my_string]"

executing script with no params produces...

# ./func_return_test.sh
writing directly to console
my_string:  [some default string]

hope this helps people

-Andy

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That has its uses, but on the whole you should avoid making an explicit redirect to the console; the output may already be redirected, or the script may be running in a context where no tty exists. You could get around that by duplicating 3>&1 at the head of the script, then manipulating &1 &3 and another placeholder &4 within the function. Ugly all round, though. –  jmb Mar 13 at 11:40

You can echo a string, but catch it by piping (|) the function to something else.

You can do it with expr, though Shellcheck reports this usage as deprecated.

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This link is dead. –  Charles Wood Dec 4 '13 at 21:09
agt@agtsoft:~/temp$ cat ./fc 
#!/bin/sh

fcall='function fcall { local res p=$1; shift; fname $*; eval "$p=$res"; }; fcall'

function f1 {
    res=$[($1+$2)*2];
}

function f2 {
    local a;
    eval ${fcall//fname/f1} a 2 3;
    echo f2:$a;
}

a=3;
f2;
echo after:a=$a, res=$res

agt@agtsoft:~/temp$ ./fc
f2:10
after:a=3, res=
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