Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to assert list in JUnit test case? I mean not only the size of the list but also the contents of the list.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

This is a legacy answer, suitable for JUnit 4.3 and below. The modern version of JUnit includes a built-in readable failure messages in the assertThat method. Prefer other answers on this question, if possible.

List<E> a = resultFromTest();
List<E> expected = Arrays.asList(new E(), new E(), ...);
assertTrue("Expected 'a' and 'expected' to be equal."+
            "\n  'a'        = "+a+
            "\n  'expected' = "+expected, 
            expected.equals(a));

For the record, as @Paul mentioned in his comment to this answer, two Lists are equal:

if and only if the specified object is also a list, both lists have the same size, and all corresponding pairs of elements in the two lists are equal. (Two elements e1 and e2 are equal if (e1==null ? e2==null : e1.equals(e2)).) In other words, two lists are defined to be equal if they contain the same elements in the same order. This definition ensures that the equals method works properly across different implementations of the List interface.

See the JavaDocs of the List interface.

share|improve this answer
1  
So you mean expected.equals(a) will take care of asserting the objects that the list is holding ? –  Kamal Jul 13 '10 at 12:07
1  
From List javadoc: Compares the specified object with this list for equality. Returns true if and only if the specified object is also a list, both lists have the same size, and all corresponding pairs of elements in the two lists are equal. (Two elements e1 and e2 are equal if (e1==null ? e2==null : e1.equals(e2)).) In other words, two lists are defined to be equal if they contain the same elements in the same order. This definition ensures that the equals method works properly across different implementations of the List interface. –  Paul McKenzie Jul 13 '10 at 12:10
    
@Kamal, yes (see Paul's comment and my edit). –  Bart Kiers Jul 13 '10 at 12:22
    
This alas provides less than helpful error message. I have found it better to write a utility class which performs a loop so you can see which elements are different. –  mlk Jul 13 '10 at 12:25
    
@mlk, perhaps, but I'm hesitant to write a custom utility method for such a thing. What about the error message I edited just now? –  Bart Kiers Jul 13 '10 at 12:41

I realise this was asked a couple years ago, probably this feature wasn't around then. But now, it's easy to just do this:

@Test
public void test_array_pass()
{
  List<String> actual = Arrays.asList("fee", "fi", "foe");
  List<String> expected = Arrays.asList("fee", "fi", "foe");

  assertThat(actual, is(expected));
  assertThat(actual, is(not(expected)));
}

If you have a recent version of Junit installed with hamcrest, just add these imports:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.*;

http://junit-team.github.io/junit/javadoc/latest/org/junit/Assert.html#assertThat(T, org.hamcrest.Matcher)

http://junit-team.github.io/junit/javadoc/latest/org/hamcrest/CoreMatchers.html

http://junit-team.github.io/junit/javadoc/latest/org/hamcrest/core/Is.html

share|improve this answer
    
@djeikyb- looks s good feature. Thanks for the update. –  Kamal May 24 '12 at 14:05
    
System.out.println(actual == expected); will return false, but System.out.println(actual.equals(expected)); will return true. –  Catfish Mar 26 '14 at 21:05
    
@Catfish yeah, that's confusing isn't it. I think I was demonstrating that the matcher is using .equals(..) instead of ==? –  djeikyb Mar 26 '14 at 21:31

If you don't care about the order of the elements, I recommend ListAssert.assertEquals in junit-addons.

Link: http://junit-addons.sourceforge.net/

For lazy Maven users:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>junit-addons</groupId>
        <artifactId>junit-addons</artifactId>
        <version>1.4</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
share|improve this answer
1  
Note: If you don't care about the order of the elements, you should be using a Set or Collection, not a List. –  Barett Jun 4 '13 at 22:54
    
I agree. This library is gross. Why on earth would ListAssert.assertEquals() default to orderless? –  Ryan Jul 7 '14 at 22:26

Don't reinvent the wheel!

There's a Google Code library that does this for you: Hamcrest

[Hamcrest] Provides a library of matcher objects (also known as constraints or predicates) allowing 'match' rules to be defined declaratively, to be used in other frameworks. Typical scenarios include testing frameworks, mocking libraries and UI validation rules.

share|improve this answer

if you don't want to build up an array list , you can try this also

@Test
public void test_array_pass()
{
  List<String> list = Arrays.asList("fee", "fi", "foe");
  Strint listToString = list.toString();
  Assert.assertTrue(listToString.contains("[fee, fi, foe]"));   // passes  
}
share|improve this answer

Don´t transform to string and compare. This is not good and perfomance. In the junit, inside Corematchers, there´s a matcher for this => hasItems

List<Integer> yourList = Arrays.asList(1,2,3,4)    
assertThat(youList, CoreMatchers.hasItems(1,2,3,4,5));

This is the better way i know to check elements in a list.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.