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Hello It' possible to use Junitperf with junit4? I've a simplet Junit4 test class with several tests and i want to do a TimedTest on single test of that class. How can i do that?

To be more clear my Junit4 class is something like:

public class TestCitta {

    @Test
    public void test1 {}

        @Test
    public void test2 {}
}

with junit3 i shold write something like:

public class TestCittaPerformance {

    public static final long toleranceInMillis = 100;

    public static Test suite() {

    	long maxElapsedTimeInMillis = 1000 + toleranceInMillis;

    	Test testCase = new TestCitta("test2");

    	Test timedTest = new TimedTest(testCase, maxElapsedTimeInMillis);

    	return timedTest;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
    	junit.textui.TestRunner.run(suite());
    }
}

with Junit4?

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This is a duplicate, mostly –  Ken Gentle Nov 27 '08 at 20:30
    
Please mark an answer as correct answer. Thanks! –  guerda Jan 7 '09 at 10:14

4 Answers 4

If you have junit4 already, why dont you use contiperf. It will do what you are looking for and with annotations.

POM goes like this.

 <dependency>
  <groupId>junit</groupId>
  <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
  <version>4.10</version>
  <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
  <groupId>org.databene</groupId>
  <artifactId>contiperf</artifactId>
  <version>2.0.0</version>
  <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

The test class goes like this

public class PersonDAOTest {
@Rule
public ContiPerfRule i = new ContiPerfRule();

And the actual test goes like this

@Test
@PerfTest(invocations = 1, threads = 1)
@Required(max = 1200, average = 250)
public void test() {
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Or you can use the annotation: @Test(timeout=1000)

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I had the same problem but was not lucky trying to make it run in different build environments. So I used the @Rule feature available since JUnit 4 to inject performance test invocation and requirements checking using annotations. It turned out to become a small library which replaced JUnitPerf in this project and I published it under the name ContiPerf. If you are interested in this approach, you can find it at http://databene.org/contiperf.

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Nice library, i like it! :) –  JavaRocky Aug 8 '10 at 22:26
    
this is a great junit4 library. –  yincrash Sep 20 '10 at 22:13

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