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Klocwork is producing an alarm which seems to be a false one. The bug it mentions describes about 80% of the total bugs in our code. Please advise,

Hereby is a snip set (paraphrase):-

//a snip set
// no bug here //

{
  char*     destStr;
  destStr = (char*)malloc(150);
  if (destStr != NULL) {
    destStr[0]= '\0';  //__here is the difference__ 
    char * myStr = malloc(200) ; 
    if (myStr != NULL) {
      strcpy(myStr , destStr) ; 
    }
    free(myStr);
  }
  free (destStr);
  destStr = NULL; 
}

//__whereas a bug here__ !

{
  char* destStr;
  destStr = (char*) malloc(150);
  if (destStr != NULL) {
    destStr[0]= '\0'; // __here is the difference__ 
  }
  else {
    printf("hello world \n");
  }
  if (destStr != NULL) {
    char * myStr = malloc(200); 
    if (myStr != NULL) {
      strcpy(myStr , destStr);   // __NNTS (not NULL terminated string) –  Buffer overflow of 'myStr' due to non null terminated string 'destStr'.__ 
    }
    free (myStr);
  }
  free (destStr);
  destStr = NULL; 
}
//end of snip set
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What version of Klocwork's products are you using? I just tried analyzing the code sample as provided and got nothing reported. Adding an intentional NPD into the code did cause a report, just to prove I was actually running the tool ;p Suggest if you're not running something reasonably recent that you try upgrading (Insight 9.1 is the most recent released product set).

Regards, Gwyn Fisher CTO and VP R&D Klocwork, Inc gwyn-at-klocwork.com

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Hi, my version is 9.0.0 (build 9.0.0.1.8), the error appears in the second block of the snip set, when calling the strcpy. It seems as if, the Klocwork doesn't know that the destStr was Null terminated by the previous "if (destStr!=NULL)". This is a paraphrase of a more complex case when one function creates a char * str and returns it to be called to another function which performs a similar action to strcpy. –  Moshe Jul 14 '10 at 8:32
    
Please note, that calloc solves the problem, but I don't want the extra overhead, as the original code is used very often. –  Moshe Jul 14 '10 at 8:34
    
OK, suggest you upgrade if possible. Without seeing the actual example I can't guarantee anything, but it's worth a shot! –  Gwyn Fisher Jul 14 '10 at 14:45
Please paste formatted code (read Readable code)

At first i thought this is obfuscated in nature.

Wrt to the question, when you do a strcpy you need to check if the destination string is big enough to hold the source string.

Here DEST_LEN is equal to amount of memory in bytes allocated.

if(source != NULL && dest != NULL)

{

strncpy (dest , source , DEST_LEN -1);

}

Thanks for the editing by the moderator.

Klockworks detects strcpy as error as its just a static analysis tool. I would suggest you to define custom macros for string related operations. This will check the length of memory to be copied. For other operations also you can easily edit this macro and avoid FALSE ALARMS like above.

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Hi, strncpy does solve the problem. But, as this is only a paraphrase of a call to a logger, I can't be sure of the size of the string itself. The logger has: (*this)[nSeverity] << strMsg << ": "<< destStr << LogEndl; when destStr must have a Null termination of course, which - as in this case I know it has one - but the Klocwork says otherwise. –  Moshe Jul 14 '10 at 8:42
    
@Moshe - Please note that when you do dynamic allocation you know the length of the string in advance. Use that to allocate memory and in the strncpy. Please be more elaborate in your comments. –  Praveen S Jul 14 '10 at 11:46

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