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I am building a billing system. The system needs to generate monthly invoices to Clients.

What I am doing now is using a For loop to check all the clients their previous invoices and decide if it is the time to generate a invoice for the client.

If there are huge number of clients in the database, I think it could be very heavy to do so.

What is the standard way of generating invoices? Is it possible to make cron jobs that records a client's next invoice date and only check a particular client when it is the time to generate an invoice.

Thanks a million

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From reading your question, I'd say you are far from qualified for doing this. You seem to be missing background both on business processes and applications programming. This is likely more than can be patched up with a few questions on SO. –  Carl Smotricz Jul 13 '10 at 14:17
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Database 101: Don't use for loops to process large amounts of data in a database. That's what SELECT/INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE are for. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 13 '10 at 14:21
    
@Marcelo Cantos I use hibernate to fetch the data and use for loop to manipulate the return data in local machine –  leon Jul 13 '10 at 15:21
    
Unless there's something going on inside the for loop that cannot be expressed as database logic, you don't want to use such a terribly inefficient solution. Use the set-based operations as much as possible, and while you're at it, dump Hibernate (see here for the long-winded version of my rationale; also see @Evgeny's answer to the same question for a more concrete critique of NHibernate that also applies to Hibernate). –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 13 '10 at 22:37
    
Interesting that Leon's "pointy haired boss" doesn't know how to do this, and neither does Leon for that matter, but they both know what language the software should be written in. –  user94154 Jul 13 '10 at 22:44
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3 Answers 3

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What is the standard way of generating invoices? Is it possible to make cron jobs that records a client's next invoice date and only check a particular client when it is the time to generate an invoice.

There is no standard way. But this task is indeed a typical candidate for a batch job. Either run it at the end of the month if you bill all clients at the same time or daily and select only the clients that are billable based on some date criteria. For each client, do what you have to. Depending on the size of your data, JPA might not be appropriate (or maybe consider Hibernate's StatelessSession or even forget it).

For the scheduler part, I've seen most often enterprise scheduler like Quartz or even bigger dedicated solutions like Control-M, Dollar-U, TNG Workload, etc.

I strongly advice to NOT create one job per client. This is really not a good solution (hell to administrate, won't scale, etc).

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Thanks for your reply –  leon Jul 13 '10 at 15:14
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You mention a database. Why don't you use it?

Put an index on the "date of previous invoide" column, add a WHERE clause to return only clients whose last invoice was sent more than a month ago.

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Thanks for your reply –  leon Jul 13 '10 at 15:17
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leon, i'm not sure if there actually is a standard way as such. each company culture will define to a certain extent, how the process is best run to fit their requirement. you'll find some apps that do both the extremes of on demand processing and others that run invoicing as a batch process. in general, it's nice to build your interfaces to accomodate both. you may also have to consider the possibility of a 3rd party at some point requiring your API via a webservice etc. (for cost savings, the company in question may actually use a bureau service to 'publish' the invoices - i know this from 1st hand experience). Your database structure will also have to be fairly robust and have plenty of fallback points, should any of the processes fail etc, etc..

Anyway - Debate... :)

jim

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Thanks for your reply –  leon Jul 13 '10 at 15:13
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