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In methodB I have done a for loop where duplicate names are not displayed. If I do this for loop in methodASet it will work. When I try to do this in methodB I get a error message "cannot find symbol - variable name1". Normally I use this.nameofthemethodheader();, but I now know I can't do this for TreeSet. Could anyone be kind enough help me here? Here is the code. Thank you. Bear in mind I want to use this for loop that I have done.

public class MyMates  
{

  public MyMates()
  {
    super();    
    names = new TreeSet<String>();  
  }

  public static void methodASet()
  {

    String[] name1 = new String[] {"Amy", "Jose", "Jeremy", "Alice", "Patrick"};
    String[] name2 = new String[] { "Alan", "Amy", "Jeremy", "Helen", "Alexi"};
    String[] name3 = new String[] { "Adel", "Aaron", "Amy", "James", "Alice" };
  }

public static void methodB()
    {


    for (int i = 0; i < name1.length; i++) 
    {
     names.add(name1[i]);
    }
    System.out.println(names);

    for (int i = 0; i < name2.length; i++)
    {
       names.add(name2[i]);
    }   
    System.out.println(names);

    for (int i = 0; i < name3.length; i++)
    {
       names.add(name3[i]);
    }   
    System.out.println(names);


    Dialog.alert("repeated names not selected");
   }
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Could you tell us in what context your "object" MyMates will be used ? In my opinion, it's bad smell to have such a class with static fields and static methods –  sly7_7 Jul 13 '10 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, try this: (I write it just for making work... in my opinion, it's an awful code)

import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeSet;

public class MyMates {

private static String[] name1 = null;
private static String[] name2 = null;
private static String[] name3 = null;
private static Set<String> names;

public MyMates() {
    methodASet();
    names = new TreeSet<String>();
}

public static void methodASet() {

    name1 = new String[]{"Amy", "Jose", "Jeremy", "Alice", "Patrick"};
    name2 = new String[]{"Alan", "Amy", "Jeremy", "Helen", "Alexi"};
    name3 = new String[]{"Adel", "Aaron", "Amy", "James", "Alice"};
}

public static void methodB() {

    for (int i = 0; i < name1.length; i++) {
        names.add(name1[i]);
    }
    System.out.println(names);

    for (int i = 0; i < name2.length; i++) {
        names.add(name2[i]);
    }
    System.out.println(names);

    for (int i = 0; i < name3.length; i++) {
        names.add(name3[i]);
    }
    System.out.println(names);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    MyMates polop = new MyMates();
    MyMates.methodB();
}
}

That prints:

[Alice, Amy, Jeremy, Jose, Patrick]

[Alan, Alexi, Alice, Amy, Helen, Jeremy, Jose, Patrick]

[Aaron, Adel, Alan, Alexi, Alice, Amy, Helen, James, Jeremy, Jose, Patrick]

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Sylvain - I realised where to put private static String[] name1 = null; etc but I am getting this error "Exception: java.lang.NullPointerException?" –  DiscoDude Jul 13 '10 at 16:33
    
I've updated. I think you don't have created an instance of MyMates object. In the constructor here, the name arrays are initialized with the call of methodAset(). –  sly7_7 Jul 13 '10 at 16:35
    
Sylvain - I have the following code in the class and in the constructor. still having the same error? public class MyMates { private static Set<String> names = new TreeSet<String>(); private static String[] name1 = null; private static String[] name2 = null; private static String[] name3 = null; public MyMates() { super(); methodASet(); names = new TreeSet<String>(); } –  DiscoDude Jul 13 '10 at 16:47
    
Can you edit the subject by writing the complete program, I mean the MyMates class, and the main method wich launches the program? –  sly7_7 Jul 13 '10 at 21:11
    
Sylvain - thank you. this is solved –  DiscoDude Jul 14 '10 at 15:19

name1, name2 and name3 are local variables; their scope is limited to the method in which they are declared. Outside of that scope they have no meaning.

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Declare String[] name1 etc outside of the method, then only put "name1 = new String[]" etc inside of the method.

  String[] name1 = null;
  String[] name2 = null;
  String[] name3 = null;

  public static void methodASet()
  {

    name1 = new String[] {"Amy", "Jose", "Jeremy", "Alice", "Patrick"};
    name2 = new String[] { "Alan", "Amy", "Jeremy", "Helen", "Alexi"};
    name3 = new String[] { "Adel", "Aaron", "Amy", "James", "Alice" };
  }
share|improve this answer
1  
If methodASet is static, so must the variables be. –  Mark Peters Jul 13 '10 at 16:05
    
When you say outside of the method do you mean in the constructor? I done that but getting the same error message. –  DiscoDude Jul 13 '10 at 16:07
    
No, put the declaration in static fields of the class –  sly7_7 Jul 13 '10 at 16:09
    
I should have included private static Set<String> names = new TreeSet<String>();. –  DiscoDude Jul 13 '10 at 16:10
    
I have done static String[] name1 = null; etc in the public class when I complie I get an error "Exception: java.lang.NullPointerException?" –  DiscoDude Jul 13 '10 at 16:15

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