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I'm working on a easter egg, where you have to activate some links in the correct order, before the secret is revealed.

I can't get this script to work. I guess I've wrote something wrong, but can't see what it is...

<script>
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $('#show').hide();
        var StepOfThree = 0;
        alert(StepOfThree);

        $('#linkone').mouseover(function() {
            StepOfThree = 1;
            alert(StepOfThree);
        });

        $('#linktwo').mouseover(function() {
            if (StepOfThree1 === 1) {
                StepOfThree = 2;
                alert(StepOfThree);
            } else {
                StepOfThree = 0;
                alert(StepOfThree);
            }
        });

        $('#linkthree').mouseover(function() {
            if (StepOfThree1 === 2) {
                $('#show').show();
                alert(StepOfThree);

            } else {
                StepOfThree = 0;
                alert(StepOfThree);
            }
        });
    });
</script>

    <a href="#" id="linkone">Link #1</a>
    <a href="#" id="linktwo">Link #2</a>
    <a href="#" id="linkthree">Link #3</a>

    <div id="show">This is hidden content</div>

The mouseOver on the #linkTwo and #linkThree doesn't even give me an Alert.. What have I done wrong?

share|improve this question
    
So with this updated version it doesn't alert on step 2 or 3? –  Cristian Sanchez Jul 13 '10 at 17:42
    
Check out my answer and compare yours... Mine works for me. –  Capt Otis Jul 13 '10 at 18:22
    
Have a look at my revision, Kenneth B. –  Matt Ball Jul 13 '10 at 18:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why are you using jQuery for Javascript primitives? This is horribly wrong! This seems like a case of jQuery-itis (sorry for the Google cache link) - use the Javascript equality operator, and don't wrap your StepOfThree for a simple numeric comparison:

if (StepOfThree === 1)
{
    // do stuff
}

My guess is you're learning Javascript at the same time as jQuery, right?


Update:

Okay, here's why your second and third handlers don't work as you expect: when you create a callback like the way you are, you're creating a closure. In effect, this "seals" the value of StepOfThree into the mouseover handlers so they never see the updated value.

Try doing it like this instead:

http://jsbin.com/ovocu/6

This way, you're closing on an object (a "reference" or "pointer" if you're familiar with C/C++/Java) rather than the primitive value of the number itself.

Some good reading on Javascript closures.


Update 2: for the simplest working example, here's what Daniel had to offer (from the comments below): http://jsbin.com/iluse3

No need to pass around an object. Sorry for any confusion this caused!

share|improve this answer
    
Your absolutely right... :-$ –  Kenneth B Jul 13 '10 at 17:16
    
I've uploaded the code - can you please look at it again? –  Kenneth B Jul 13 '10 at 17:36
    
@Bears: I don't think that's how closures in javascript work. It will only "seal" the value as you say if it's passed as an argument to a function, since that's the only way to create a new lexical scope in javascript. It still works fine without storing it as an object property: jsbin.com/iluse3 –  Cristian Sanchez Jul 13 '10 at 21:22
    
@Daniel: I haven't looked at your code, but you're definitely wrong about having to pass in the value - that's the whole difference between a closure and a "regular" function. –  Matt Ball Jul 14 '10 at 0:30
    
@Bears will eat you: If that were true then the module pattern would not work. Functions have access to the variables (not values) and parameters of the function they are defined within -- this is verbatim from Douglas Crawford. The reason why the OP's script does not work is because "StepOfThree1" is not defined. Read the "Creating closures in loops: A common mistake" section in your link to see what I mean when I said it would not "seal" the value. You can only seal values by creating a function factory which overwrites the closure environment with its own variables. –  Cristian Sanchez Jul 14 '10 at 2:32

Why not use the built in operators to check equivalence? The is method is meant to test selectors on jQuery objects, not to test equivalence on regular objects or variables.

Instead of:

if ($(StepOfThree).is(1))

Use:

if (StepOfThree === 1) {

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated it, but link#2 and link#3 still doesn't work... Can you explain why? –  Kenneth B Jul 13 '10 at 17:32

You have redeclared your variable, overwriting its scope.

    ...
    var StepOfThree = 0; 

    $('#linkone').mouseover(function() { 
        var StepOfThree = 1; 
    });
    ...

There are two variables there, both named 'StepOfThree'. To fix, take away the 'var' for all but the first declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the code... Can you please look again? Because it doesn't work with LInk2 and 3... –  Kenneth B Jul 13 '10 at 17:29
    
Variable named "StepOfThree1"? Use the original name. –  Matt Brunell Jul 13 '10 at 19:30

You need to remove your vars

<script>
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $('#show').hide();
        var StepOfThree = 0;

        $('#linkone').mouseover(function() {
            StepOfThree = 1;
        });

        $('#linktwo').mouseover(function() {
            if (StepOfThree == 1) {
                StepOfThree = 2;
            } else {
                StepOfThree = 0;
            }
        });

        $('#linkthree').mouseover(function() {
            if (StepOfThree == 2 ) {
                $('#show').show();
            } else {
                StepOfThree = 0;
            }
        });
    });
</script>

You are including jquery right?

share|improve this answer

What's happening is that your StepOfThree variable is not global - it is inside your $(document).ready function. Declare it outside: script open tag var StepOfThree=0; $(document).ready stuff

share|improve this answer
    
Nope. It's more subtle than that. –  Matt Ball Jul 13 '10 at 18:49

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