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Normally, I'd do this:

try
{
    code

    code that might throw an anticipated exception you want to handle

    code

    code that might throw an anticipated exception you want to handle

    code
}
catch 
{

}

Are there any benefits to doing it this way?

code

try
{
    code that might throw an anticipated exception you want to handle
}
catch
{
}

code

try
{
    code that might throw an anticipated exception you want to handle
}
catch
{
}

code

Update:

I originally asked this question w/reference to C#, but as A. Levy commented, it could apply to any exception handling language, so I made the tags reflect that.

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4  
Do you want the processing to stop as soon as the first error occurs ( the first example ) or it can continue even if a part of the processing fail (the other one)? –  David L.-Pratte Jul 13 '10 at 17:53
    
@DLP - I'd like it to stop processing - I see someone mentioned it after you. That's a good point. –  Steve Jul 13 '10 at 17:59
2  
Although you tagged this with C# and .net, I think it is really language agnostic. This question applies to any language with exceptions such as Java, C++, JavaScript, OCaml, F#, Python, Clojure, etc. It would also apply to the condition/restart system in Common Lisp and various other Lisps. So I'd ask for you to make this language agnostic...Your call though. –  A. Levy Jul 13 '10 at 18:09
    
That's true. I replaced the language specific tags. –  Steve Jul 13 '10 at 18:55

10 Answers 10

up vote 16 down vote accepted

It depends. If you want to provide special handling for specific errors then use multiple catch blocks:

try
{ 
    // code that throws an exception
    // this line won't execute
}
catch (StackOverflowException ex)
{
    // special handling for StackOverflowException 
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   // all others
}

If, however, the intent is to handle an exception and continue executing, place the code in separate try-catch blocks:

try
{ 
    // code that throws an exception

}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   // handle
}

try
{ 
    // this code will execute unless the previous catch block 
    // throws an exception (re-throw or new exception) 
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   // handle
}
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+1 for adding the comment about further execution that I neglected to mention. –  Ed S. Jul 13 '10 at 18:24

Neither, just use multiple catch blocks for specific exceptions (unless there is just a ton of code in the block and only a couple of lines may throw an exception.In that case I would go with the second method).

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If I could choose the second I would probably separate this into two functions.

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2  
+1: I agree completely, though I'd probably write this as "If I could choose the second, I would..", since I think this is the right thing to do any time it's possible... –  Reed Copsey Jul 13 '10 at 17:52
    
@Reed, nice suggestion, updated post to take into account. Thanks. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 13 '10 at 17:55

You're thinking about this the wrong way. What do you need to do in your catch blocks? If you would recover from any of the possible exceptions by running the same code, no matter which operation threw the exception, then use one catch block. If you need to do different clean-up operations depending on which operation threw, then use multiple catch blocks.

Also, if you can use try/finally or the RAII pattern instead of try/catch, then you should.

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+1 for the RAII pattern, but I doubt the OP is thinking about it the wrong way. –  Marcus Adams Jul 13 '10 at 18:21

Second method is better in my opinion because it allows you to trap errors with more accuracy.

Also wrapping your entire code inside one big try/catch block is bad, if your app has some sort of problem and it crashes but since you trapped a big generic execption the chance that you can actualy handle it correctly is lower. You should have spesfic parts inside try catch, like if your reading a file or taking user input. That way you can better handle that exeception

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I prefer the second method - it makes debugging easier, error handling more accurate and also feeds nicely into your unit testing nicely too.

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Second method. Keeping the code that might throw an exception separate from other code - keeps the section smaller and easier to manage instead of wrapping all code, even that which will not throw exceptions.

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I would go for the 2nd option, but whenever I see this code pattern my first feeling is to think about splitting it into multiple functions/methods. Obviously whether to do so depends on what the code is doing ;)

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It depends on the nature of the type of errors happen in your code.

  1. If the handling of those errors you are going to do is same go for single try ... catch for that group of code. Else it will be too tedious.

  2. If the errors required different handling, separate it because you have to.

DO NOT APPLY A SINGLE METHOD FOR ALL CASES. PROGRAMMING MOST OF THE TIME IS CONTEXT SPECIFIC :)

You need to reach a balance of "GOOD/COMPLEX" and "BAD/SIMPLE". The more you code, you will be less stuck in this kind of dilemma :)

Happy programming!

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In general, it is poor form to write an entire sentence in caps lock. But in the end, that is context specific –  Joe Philllips Jul 13 '10 at 18:51
    
@Joe Philllips: Thanks for reminding. –  ttchong Jul 14 '10 at 2:50

2nd way but ideally use code guards - try/catch is costly

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2  
Try/catch in C# is really not very costly, unless you actually catch something... –  Reed Copsey Jul 13 '10 at 17:53

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