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I have the following (simplified) object literal. The icons method uses closure to hide the icons variable, which I'd like to have as an associative array for later lookups.

var MapListings = {
    icons: function () {
        var allIcons = [] ;

        return {
            add: function (iconType, iconImage) {
                var icon = new GIcon(MapListings.baseIcon);
                icon.image = iconImage;
                allIcons[iconType] = icon; // fails, but this is what I want
                // allIcons.push(icon); // works, but this is not what I want
            },
            get: function () {
                return allIcons;
            }
        };

    } ()
}

I add items to the to the icons object like so:

MapListings.icons.add("c7", "/images/maps/blue.png");
MapListings.icons.add("c8", "/images/maps/red.png");

The following doesn't work:

allIcons[iconType] = icon;

But this does:

allIcons.push(icon);

Outside of the closure the associative array style works fine, so perhaps there is a conflict with jQuery? The error I get in firebug a is undefined looks to come from the library. I'd like to maintain the associative array style.

Any ideas?

Update

It looks like this conflict is coming from google maps. Odd, not sure of a way around this.

Dumbass Update

The part of my object literal that returned a base GIcon() object wasn't returning an object at all. So, the object didn't have the right properties.

baseIcon: function () {
    var base = new GIcon();
    base.shadow = '/images/maps/shadow.png';
    base.iconSize = new GSize(12, 20);
    base.shadowSize = new GSize(22, 20);
    base.iconAnchor = new GPoint(6, 20);
    base.infoWindowAnchor = new GPoint(5, 1);
    return base;
}

And MapListings.baseIcon is NOT the same as MapListings.baseIcon()! D'oh

share|improve this question
    
I just pasted this into an HTML file and replaced GIcon with a placeholder. seems to work fine. Maybe the error is in the GIcon object not your code. I'm running Firefox 3.5 on Linux. –  Gennadiy Jul 13 '10 at 19:00
1  
Are you sure the "a is undefined" error is related to this code? –  Jacob Jul 13 '10 at 19:00
    
@gennaidiy - GIcon is from google maps. It's not the actual GIcon object that's creating the conflict, but it appears to be the google maps library. –  ScottE Jul 13 '10 at 19:07
    
Are you using any other library besides jQuery? And what version of jQuery is it? The only way that line of code can end up in jQuery is for there to be some changes bound to the native Array object. jQuery itself doesn't do that, but other libraries do. (In fact the Google library might, for all I know.) –  Pointy Jul 13 '10 at 19:18
    
When you say allIcons[iconType] = icon fails, what exactly fails in that assignment? It's a simple assignment on an object that I don't see how it can fail. Are you sure this is where you're seeing the exception? Put a breakpoint and step through the code to find out more. –  Anurag Jul 13 '10 at 19:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if you want a lookup table, just do var allIcons = {}

EDIT: Though technically it should work either way, as an array IS an object. Are you sure there isn't more to this?

EDIT #2: Can't you just make allIcons as a property of MapListings?

EDIT #3: I think it's working, but maybe you're not accessing it right? That or it fails creating the object with Google somehow, or the error you posted is happening elsewhere, and not here

function GIcon(){};
var MapListings = {
    icons: function () {
        var allIcons = [] ;

        return {
            add: function (iconType, iconImage) {
                var icon = new GIcon(MapListings.baseIcon);
                icon.image = iconImage;
                allIcons[iconType] = icon; // fails, but this is what I want
                // allIcons.push(icon); // works, but this is not what I want
                window.x = allIcons
            },
            get: function () {
                return allIcons;
            }
        };

    } ()
};

MapListings.icons.add("c7", "/images/maps/blue.png");
MapListings.icons.add("c8", "/images/maps/red.png");

alert( MapListings.icons.get()['c8']['image'] )

You shouldn't loop using .length but instead directly access c7 or c8.

x = MapListings.icons.get();
for ( var prop in x ) {
    if ( x.hasOwnProperty(prop ) ) {
        alert( x[prop]['image'] )
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
tried that already, same error: a is undefined –  ScottE Jul 13 '10 at 18:55
1  
+1 for noting that the fault is elsewhere. –  Anurag Jul 13 '10 at 19:01
    
this defeats the purpose of the closure. I'd prefer to leave it as a private member as the .add method does some other work. I only want icons added this way. –  ScottE Jul 13 '10 at 19:04
    
See my edit above. The lesson of the day is to debug. Sorry for the bother. –  ScottE Jul 13 '10 at 19:27

So one thing you could do to fix this is change the way you reference the array. Since external to your add method you do this:

MapListings.icons["c7"]

You can also just use this to add to your array inside your add function:

add: function (iconType, iconImage) { 
    MapListings.icons[iconType] = iconImage;
}, 
share|improve this answer

allIcons[iconType] = icon; fails because allIcons is an Array, not an object. Try initializing allIcons to {} instead. That would allow you to place items in the collection by key.

share|improve this answer
    
Not true, it works just fine outside of my example. They aren't recommended to be used in this fashion, but look here: hunlock.com/blogs/Mastering_Javascript_Arrays –  ScottE Jul 13 '10 at 19:03
    
Nothing that I can find in that document says that string indexes are allowed for Arrays. –  Jacob Jul 13 '10 at 19:10
1  
Any object in JS can have properties, so an array can too. –  casablanca Jul 13 '10 at 19:11
    
Ah, I what you might mean. I guess you can add arbitrary properties to an Array object. But it's not the same as an associative array. –  Jacob Jul 13 '10 at 19:11
    
Yes, correct. It's a bit of a fake. –  ScottE Jul 13 '10 at 19:16

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