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Here is an example:

s="abcd+subtext@example.com"

s.match(/+[^@]*/)

Result => "+subtext"

The thing is, i do not want to include "+" in there. I want the result to be "subtext", without the +

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use parentheses in the regular expression to create a match group:

s="abcd+subtext@example.com"
s =~ /\+([^@]*)/ && $1
=> "subtext"
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7  
Another syntax for this is s[/\+([^@]*)/, 1]. –  mckeed Jul 13 '10 at 19:38
1  
@mckeed, I didn't know that. Very nice! –  Wayne Conrad Jul 13 '10 at 19:40
    
thanks folks! are these only for ruby? Also, what does the && stands for? –  ming yeow Jul 14 '10 at 1:21
    
@ming yeow, every regular expression engine I've ever used has match groups. && is a short-curcuit logical and. In this context, it means "only evaluate $1 if s matches the regular expression, otherwise return nil. –  Wayne Conrad Jul 14 '10 at 1:52

You could use a positive lookbehind assertion, which I believe is written like this:

s.match(/(?<=\+)[^@]*/)

EDIT: So I just noticed this is a Ruby question, and I don't know if this feature is in Ruby (I'm not a Ruby programmer myself). If it is, you can use it; if not... I'll delete this.

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2  
This will work only in Ruby 1.9+ –  mckeed Jul 13 '10 at 19:36
    
@mckeed: thanks. –  David Z Jul 13 '10 at 19:43

This works for me:

\+([^@]+)

I like to use Rubular for playing around with regular expressions. Makes debugging a lot easier.

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+1 for Rubular! –  denis.peplin Oct 14 at 8:59

I don't know Ruby very well, but if you add capturing around the portion you want it should work. ie: \+([^@]*)

You can test these with Rubular. This specific match is here: http://www.rubular.com/r/pqFza9jlmX

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