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I saw something about needing to have the assembly available for the type of the first argument passed to the function. I think it is, I can't figure out what am I missing.

This code is in a service. I was running the service under the 'NETWORK SERVICES' user account, when I changed the account to that of the session I was logged on with it worked ok. But, what's the difference, and how can I get it to work for the NETWORK SERVICES user.

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8 Answers

up vote -2 down vote accepted

I finally found an answer: it appears that the type given to ApplicationHost.CreateApplicationHost() must be in an assembly located in the GAC. Simple, and stupid :)

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Cool. Did you find this in some documentation I can look at... or was it by trial and error? –  Scott Langham Jan 19 '09 at 14:32
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voted down becuase the assembly does not need to be in the GAC –  Simon Apr 7 '10 at 21:21
    
Indeed, it's not needed to put the assembly into the GAC. This has to do with Assembly binding. Put fusion logging on and you can exactly see where it goes wrong –  Jeroen Landheer Sep 3 '10 at 20:01
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copy your binary to the bin folder of your web app will also fix this.

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By the way, this page has a little more information on this topic and a possible way to workaround the issue of GAC vs copying your assembly to the bin folder. The page is a few years old at this point but it still seems relevant.

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I had this problem as well. I think the runtime is trying to load the assembly containing the type passed as the first argument to CreateApplicationHost and it fails to find it

For some bizarre reason it worked when I created a bin directory in my physical directory (the third argument) containing the exe or assembly which contains the type it was trying to load.

I don't know why it does not look in the working directory first...

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Network Service is a built in account that has very limited access (for good reason) to resources. You should probably not change it because you will open your site up to other potential vulnerabilities.

If you absolutely have to, see here for how to configure it to have access to other resources.

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I think this is related more closely to the Network Services account or Code Access Security and has nothing to do with the GAC. I am using CreateApplicationHost() to create an ASP.Net host in an MS Test project and it works like a champ. The type that I use is not in an assembly that is deployed to the GAC or even strongly named (It is defined in the TestProject).

You gotta love these types of inconsistencies... it keeps life interesting.

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I couldn't get this to work either in .NET2 on Windows 2008 (64-bit, but I don't think that mattered). It worked when my user was local administrator, but I don't want my services to be running with elevated privileges. I searched high and low and finally figured it out (without adding the assembly to the GAC, equally bad for me): Create a web.config file for my self-hosted site that sets up the bin folder for probing. Before I didn't have a web.config file since my sites were all handled in code. This is what my config file now looks like:

<configuration>
  <runtime>
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
      <probing privatePath="bin"/>
    </assemblyBinding>
  </runtime>
</configuration>
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