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I have a query like this:

SELECT jobs.*, 
  (CASE WHEN lead_informations.state IS NOT NULL THEN lead_informations.state ELSE 'NEW' END) as lead_state
FROM "jobs"
LEFT JOIN lead_informations
  ON lead_informations.job_id = jobs.id
  AND lead_informations.mechanic_id = 3
WHERE (lead_state = 'NEW') 

Which gives the following error:

PGError: ERROR:  column "lead_state" does not exist
LINE 1: ...s.id AND lead_informations.mechanic_id = 3 WHERE (lead_state...

In MySql this is valid, but apparently not in Postgresql. From what I can gather, the reason is that the SELECT part of the query is evaluated later than the WHERE part. Is there a common workaround for this problem?

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I think this is not valid in PostgreSQL... –  pcent Jul 13 '10 at 20:47
1  
@pcent That would explain the error then ... –  troelskn Jul 14 '10 at 10:10
    
It's a good question, but a bizarre example query. You never want to select a non-NULL value for that column, so the whole CASE statement is entirely unnecessary. –  phils Sep 4 '12 at 5:07
    
@phils You're right. The query is dynamically generated, so the where clause might contain something else, but the select part would remain the same. –  troelskn Sep 4 '12 at 8:06
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In MySql this is valid, but apparently not in Postgresql. From what I can gather, the reason is that the SELECT part of the query is evaluated later than the WHERE part. Is there a common workaround for this problem?

MySQL's support is, as you experienced, non-standard. The correct way is to reprint the same expression used in the SELECT clause:

SELECT jobs.*, 
       CASE 
         WHEN lead_informations.state IS NOT NULL THEN lead_informations.state 
         ELSE 'NEW' 
       END as lead_state
  FROM "jobs"
LEFT JOIN lead_informations ON lead_informations.job_id = jobs.id
                           AND lead_informations.mechanic_id = 3
    WHERE lead_informations.state IS NULL
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Additionally, you could replace the CASE statement with COALESCE: COALESCE(lead_informations.state, 'NEW') AS lead_state. –  OMG Ponies Jul 13 '10 at 20:54
    
Seems a bit awkward to have to duplicate the logic like that, but I guess I'll just do that then. Didn't know about COALESCE - Thanks for that tip. –  troelskn Jul 14 '10 at 10:10
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You would need to either duplicate the case statement in the where clause, or my preference is to do something like the following:

SELECT *
FROM (
SELECT 
    jobs.*, 
    (CASE WHEN lead_informations.state IS NOT NULL THEN lead_informations.state ELSE 'NEW' END) as lead_state
FROM 
    "jobs"
    LEFT JOIN lead_informations ON lead_informations.job_id = jobs.id
    AND lead_informations.mechanic_id = 3
) q1
WHERE (lead_state = 'NEW')
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I struggled on the same issue and "mysql syntax is non-standard" is not a valid argument in my opinion. PostgreSQL adds handy non-standard extensions as well, for example "INSERT ... RETURNING ..." to get auto ids after inserts. Also, repeating large queries is not an elegant solution.

However, I found the WITH statement very helpful. It sort of creates a temporary view within the query which you can use like a usual table then. I'm not sure if I have rewritten your JOIN correctly, but in general it should work like this:

WITH jobs_refined AS (
    SELECT
        jobs.*,
        (SELECT CASE WHEN lead_informations.state IS NOT NULL THEN lead_informations.state ELSE 'NEW' END) AS lead_state
    FROM jobs
    LEFT JOIN lead_informations
        ON lead_informations.job_id = jobs.id
        AND lead_informations.mechanic_id = 3
)
SELECT *
FROM jobs_refined
WHERE lead_state = 'NEW'
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3  
saying something is "non-standard" is completely valid when you're looking to do something across two different products. they both implement parts of the SQL standard(s) and both have non-standard extensions. don't expect the non-standard extensions to translate across. DO expect the SQL standard portions to translate. that being said - thanks for the WITH example. –  Messy Dec 29 '11 at 14:26
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I believe the common solution is to use an inner SELECT for the calculation (or CASE statement in this case) so that the result of the inner SELECT is available to the entire outer query by the time the execution gets to that query. Otherwise, the WHERE clause is evaluated first and knows nothing about the SELECT clause.

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