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Suppose you have sets of Fluent conventions that apply to specific groups of mappings, but not to all of them.

My thought here was, I'll create custom C# attributes that I can apply to the Fluent *Map classes - and write conventions that determine acceptance by inspecting the *Map class to see if the custom attribute was applied.

That way, I can select groups of conventions and apply them to various mappings by just tagging them with a custom attribute - [UseShortNamingConvention], etc.

I'm new to NHibernate (and Fluent, and C# for that matter) - is this approach possible?

And is it sane? :-)


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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes it is! Ive actually done something similiar but went with Marker Interfaces instead (INotCacheable, IComponent), but Marker Interface or Attribute, should't be that much of a difference.

When applying your conventions, just check for the presence of your attribute and ur good :)


Adding some code samples

    public class MyMappingConventions : IReferenceConvention, IClassConvention
        public void Apply(IOneToManyCollectionInstance instance)
            instance.Key.Column(instance.EntityType.Name + "ID");

            if ((typeof(INotCacheable).IsAssignableFrom(instance.Relationship.Class.GetUnderlyingSystemType())))


        public void Apply(IClassInstance instance)
            instance.Table(instance.EntityType.Name + "s");
            //If inheriting from IIMutable make it readonly
            if ((typeof(IImmutable).IsAssignableFrom(instance.EntityType)))

            //If not cacheable
            if ((typeof(INotCacheable).IsAssignableFrom(instance.EntityType)))

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Do you know how? ... instance.EntityType will give me the type of entity being mapped - is there a property that will give me the EntityMapType? – Jul 14 '10 at 13:09
Added code samples –  Kenny Eliasson Jul 15 '10 at 6:39

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