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It could probably be a simple question but I couldn't find a clear answer for it. I have multiple threads in c code and one of them uses select to wait for n seconds. The question that I have is that does it blocks the entire process for n seconds (like usleep) or does select blocks only the calling thread (more like nanosleep). Thanks for the answers.

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1  
sleep does not block the entire process, or at least never in my experience. –  Zan Lynx Jul 13 '10 at 21:12
    
I think it does...this is from the man page of usleep "DESCRIPTION The usleep() function suspends execution of the calling process for (at least) usec microseconds." whereas if you look at the man page of nanosleep it clearly mentions that it blocks the calling thread –  CuriousKernelHacker Jul 13 '10 at 22:17
    
you are victim of the wording. all the sleep/block functions block the current thread. there is no function which is capable of putting the whole process with many threads into sleep. –  Dummy00001 Jul 14 '10 at 12:21
    
@Dummy ..yeah I do realize that now after running a test code yesterday.. Even the man pages can be misleading sometimes..anyway thanks all for clearing things up for me –  CuriousKernelHacker Jul 14 '10 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

I've seen several implementations in which one thread is blocking on select while other threads continue processing - so, yes, it only blocks the running thread.

(Sorry for not bringing any references)

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Thanks.. yes I think that should be the case but I just couldn't recall any such usage. –  CuriousKernelHacker Jul 13 '10 at 22:20

The POSIX spec for select specifically mentions "thread" in only one place, where it talks about restoring the signal mask of the calling thread by pselect().

As with the other answers, my experience also says the answer is yes, it only blocks the calling thread.

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Yes. A sloppy but still pretty conclusive test.

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

using namespace std;

pthread_mutex_t cout_mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

void *task1(void *X)
{
   timeval t = {0, 100000};

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&cout_mutex);
        cout << "Thread A going to sleep" << endl;
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&cout_mutex);

        select(0, NULL, NULL, NULL, &t);

        pthread_mutex_lock(&cout_mutex);
        cout << "Thread A awake" << endl;
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&cout_mutex);
    }

   return (NULL);
}


void *task2(void *X)
{
   pthread_mutex_lock(&cout_mutex);
   cout << "Thread B down for the long sleep" << endl;
   pthread_mutex_unlock(&cout_mutex);

   timeval t = {5, 0};
   select(0, NULL, NULL, NULL, &t);

   pthread_mutex_lock(&cout_mutex);
   cout << "Thread B glad to be awake" << endl;
   pthread_mutex_unlock(&cout_mutex);

   return (NULL);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  pthread_t ThreadA,ThreadB;

  pthread_create(&ThreadA,NULL,task1,NULL);
  pthread_create(&ThreadB,NULL,task2,NULL);

  pthread_join(ThreadA,NULL);
  pthread_join(ThreadB,NULL);

  return (0);
}  
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