Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
if($a == 4){
   echo 'ok';
}

Now displays an error because $a variable is not defined. my decision:

if(isset($a)){
    if($a == 4){
    echo 'ok';
    }
}

But maybe there are better solutions?

share|improve this question
6  
"Uncertain variables" == Schrödinger variables? ;o) –  deceze Jul 14 '10 at 7:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I think it's good enough. You could merge the two ifs if you like.

if (isset($a) && $a == 4) {
  echo 'ok';
}
share|improve this answer
    
thats exactly how most programmers do things. –  RobertPitt Jul 14 '10 at 8:31

Your solution is correct, but if you want to be 100% "clean" then you should never have to use isset(), as your variables should always be in scope. You should define $a = null at the beginning, and check if it is null.

This is how a statically typed program would work (say java). But since you are using PHP, you could decide to relax this, and play by PHP rules, by allowing use of undefined variables (which makes code more dirty, but shorter and more readable). It is up to you. In this case, change the error reporting in php.ini not to issue this kind of notices.

share|improve this answer
    
Catches the point: if you use PHP, do it the way PHP is meant to do it. –  Iacopo Jul 14 '10 at 6:52
1  
Actually, isset() is still useful for use with arrays. Otherwise, I agree with you. Generally, isset() shouldn't have to be used this way. @Iacopo Just because PHP allows us to be sloppy, doesn't mean that we should be sloppy. –  George Marian Jul 14 '10 at 6:59

Ideally, you shouldn't have to do this. If $a is originally being created inside a conditional, but not under all circumstances, you should declare it and set it to null before that conditional.

Compare:

if(false)
{
   $a = 4;
}
//...
if($a == 4){
   echo 'ok';
}

To:

$a = null;

if(false)
{
   $a = 4;
}
//...
if($a == 4){
   echo 'ok';
}

Yes, that if (false) will never set $a to 4. However, the second example will not trigger the warning.

Also, I hope you're not relying on register_globals being on.

Otherwise, if you must use isset(), I would combine the call into one if statement, as suggested by KennyTM.

share|improve this answer

@ has done so much damage to the PHP community at large. I can't count the hours gone into debugging and fixing @ty code.

share|improve this answer

The following solutions are shorter, but ugly (i.e. the kind of code that make seasoned programmers run away in disgust):

if (@$a == 4) // Don't show the warning in this line (*UGLY*)
  echo 'OK';

or

error_reporting(error_reporting() & ~E_NOTICE); // Don't show any notice at all (*EVEN UGLIER*)

Both are considered bad practise, as you could miss an unrelated notice which could be symptomatic for some deeper problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
Only ever use @ for errors that are not otherwise avoidable, for example @unserialize($mayNotBeUnserializable). Never get into the habit of using an @ where an isset would do! Also, never hide errors (during development)! That doesn't make them go away, it just makes debugging that much harder. (Can't make that clear enough. :)) –  deceze Jul 14 '10 at 7:12
1  
"Both are considered bad practise" That saved you from a downvote. It's a bad idea to suggest such things to newbies. –  George Marian Jul 14 '10 at 7:23
    
@George I agree. But before long, they will some encounter sort of if "in the wild" and think to themselves: that's great, it's saving me X keystrokes. It's not a "better solution", though, if "better" refers to beauty of code. –  giraff Jul 14 '10 at 8:05
    
A fair point. I guess my suggestion would be to make the disclaimers more prominent. It's not exactly evident from your post that you're describing what not to do. –  George Marian Jul 14 '10 at 8:14
    
@George Good idea. –  giraff Jul 14 '10 at 8:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.