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I have one problem with the ALTER TABLE in postgre. I want to change size of the varchar column. When I try to do this, It says that the view is dependent on that column. I can't drop the view because comething else is dependent on it. Is there any other way than to drop everything and recreate it again?

I just found one option, which is to remove the table joining from the view, when I will not change the returned columns, I can do that. But still, there is more views I'll need to change. Isn't there anything how can I say that it should be deferred and checked with commit?

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copy the view query and than delete it and make changes to the Table –  taher Jul 15 '10 at 5:30
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have run into this problem and couldn't find any way around it. Unfortunately, as best I can tell, one must drop the views, alter the column type on the underlying table, and then recreate the views. This can happen entirely in a single transaction.

Constraint deferral doesn't apply to this problem. In other words, even SET CONSTRAINTS ALL DEFERRED has no impact on this limitation. To be specific, constraint deferral does not apply to the consistency check that prints ERROR: cannot alter type of a column used by a view or rule when one tries to alter the type of a column underlying a view.

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If you don't need to change the type of the field, but just the size of it, this approach should work:

Starting with these tables:

CREATE TABLE foo (id integer primary key, names varchar(10));
CREATE VIEW voo AS (SELECT id, names FROM foo);

\d foo and \d voo both show the length as 10:

id     | integer               | not null
names  | character varying(10) | 

Now change the lengths to 20 in the pg_attribute table:

UPDATE pg_attribute SET atttypmod = 20+4
WHERE attrelid IN ('foo'::regclass, 'voo'::regclass)
AND attname = 'names';

(note: the 20+4 is some crazy postgresql legacy thing, the +4 is compulsory.)

Now \d foo shows:

id     | integer               | not null
names  | character varying(10) | 

Bonus: that was waaay faster than doing:

ALTER TABLE foo ALTER COLUMN names TYPE varchar(20);

Technically you can change the size of the table column without changing the size of the view column, but no guarantees on what side effects that will have; it's probably best to change them both at once.

source and fuller explanation: http://sniptools.com/databases/resize-a-column-in-a-postgresql-table-without-changing-data

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You should avoid changing the catalogs (such as pg_attribute) manually whenever possible. There is a real risk of getting something wrong and causing errors, including crashes and data corruption, later when you least expect it. ONLY do it as a last resort, AFTER consulting the source code to make sure you're not missing anything. Suggesting this without any disclaimers is irresponsible. –  intgr Jan 31 at 12:08
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I ran into this problem today and found a work around to avoid dropping and recreating the VIEW . I cannot just drop my VIEW because it is a master VIEW that has many dependent VIEWs built on top of it. Short of having a rebuild script to DROP CASCADE and then recreate ALL of my VIEWs this is a work around.

I change my master VIEW to use a dummy value for the offending column, altered the column in the table, and switched my VIEW back to the column. Using a setup like this:

CREATE TABLE base_table
(
  base_table_id integer,
  base_table_field1 numeric(10,4)
);

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW master_view AS 
  SELECT
    base_table_id AS id,
    (base_table_field1 * .01)::numeric AS field1
  FROM base_table;

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW dependent_view AS 
  SELECT
    id AS dependent_id,
    field1 AS dependent_field1
  FROM master_view;

Trying to alter base_table_field1 type like this:

ALTER TABLE base_table ALTER COLUMN base_table_field1 TYPE numeric(10,6);

Will give you this error:

ERROR:  cannot alter type of a column used by a view or rule
DETAIL:  rule _RETURN on view master_view depends on column "base_table_field1"

If you change master_view to use a dummy value for the column like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW master_view AS 
  SELECT
    base_table_id AS id,
    0.9999 AS field1
  FROM base_table;

Then run your alter:

ALTER TABLE base_table ALTER COLUMN base_table_field1 TYPE numeric(10,6);

And switch your view back:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW master_view AS 
  SELECT
    base_table_id AS id,
    (base_table_field1 * .01)::numeric AS field1
  FROM base_table;

It all depends on if your master_view has an explicit type that does not change. Since my VIEW uses '(base_table_field1 * .01)::numeric AS field1' it works, but 'base_table_field1 AS field1' would not because the column type changes. This approach might help in some cases like mine.

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How is this better than dropping the view, altering the table and creating the view again? I find that this is worse, with having to look through the view's DDL and find instances of the column. When you're dropping, all you need is to keep a copy of the original view's DDL, so that you can create it again. –  ADTC Oct 7 '13 at 8:49
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