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How can I capture Ctrl + Alt + K + P keys on a C# form? thanks

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2  
Globally or just when the form has focus? –  Codesleuth Jul 14 '10 at 7:19
1  
The form has focus –  Ristovak Jul 14 '10 at 11:54

4 Answers 4

It is a chord, you cannot detect it without memorizing having seen the first keystroke of the chord. This works:

public partial class Form1 : Form {
    public Form1() {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    private bool prefixSeen;

    protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData) {
        if (prefixSeen) {
            if (keyData == (Keys.Alt | Keys.Control | Keys.P)) {
                MessageBox.Show("Got it!");
            }
            prefixSeen = false;
            return true;
        }
        if (keyData == (Keys.Alt | Keys.Control | Keys.K)) {
            prefixSeen = true;
            return true;
        }
        return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
    }
}
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Won't this capture repeating keys too? If a chord like CTRL + P + P is used for instance? –  rymdsmurf Mar 23 at 16:39
    
Repeating keys would produce Ctrl+P Ctrl+P. So no. –  Hans Passant Mar 23 at 17:15
    
I just compiled and tested the code, and it does (incorrectly) captures repeating keys if the chord uses the same key twice. For instance, holding CTRL + ALT + P will trigger the CTRL + ALT + P + P chord. –  rymdsmurf Mar 24 at 10:28
    
Then you did it wrong, remove Keys.Alt and Keys.Control from the second if() statement. –  Hans Passant Mar 24 at 10:33
    
What do you mean, I "did it wrong"? It's your code... :-) I just replaced "Keys.K" with "Keys.P". And removing Alt and Control, as you suggested, would block the key 'P' from being used at all in the form. –  rymdsmurf Mar 24 at 11:29

I'm not sure if you can. What you CAN do however, is the way Visual Studio does it. It has shortcuts like Ctrl + K, C. You first press Ctrl+K, then hold down Ctrl and press C. In your case, you could check for Ctrl+Alt+K,P.

You can first check for only Ctrl+Alt+K as done in the other answers, then set a member variable/flag to indicate Ctrl+Alt+K has been pressed. In the same method where you check for K you can check for P, and if the flag you just set was set to true, do whatever you need to do. Otherwise set the flag back to false.

Rough pseudo-code:

private bool m_bCtrlAltKPressed = false;

public void KeyDown() {
  if (Ctrl+Alt+K)
  {
    m_bCtrlAltKPressed = true;
  }
  else if (Ctrl+Alt+P && m_bCtrlAltKPressed) {
    //do stuff
  }
  else {
    m_bCtrlAltKPressed = false;
  }
}

Hope that's clear enough.

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MessageFilters can help you in this case.

    public class KeystrokMessageFilter : System.Windows.Forms.IMessageFilter
    {
        public KeystrokMessageFilter() { }

        #region Implementation of IMessageFilter

        public bool PreFilterMessage(ref Message m)
        {
            if ((m.Msg == 256 /*0x0100*/))
            {
                switch (((int)m.WParam) | ((int)Control.ModifierKeys))
                {
                    case (int)(Keys.Control | Keys.Alt | Keys.K):
                        MessageBox.Show("You pressed ctrl + alt + k");
                        break;
                    //This does not work. It seems you can only check single character along with CTRL and ALT.
                    //case (int)(Keys.Control | Keys.Alt | Keys.K | Keys.P):
                    //    MessageBox.Show("You pressed ctrl + alt + k + p");
                    //    break;
                    case (int)(Keys.Control | Keys.C): MessageBox.Show("You pressed ctrl+c");
                        break;
                    case (int)(Keys.Control | Keys.V): MessageBox.Show("You pressed ctrl+v");
                        break;
                    case (int)Keys.Up: MessageBox.Show("You pressed up");
                        break;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }

        #endregion


    }

Now in your C# WindowsForm, register the MessageFilter for capturing key-strokes and combinations.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    KeystrokMessageFilter keyStrokeMessageFilter = new KeystrokMessageFilter();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }       
    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Application.AddMessageFilter(keyStrokeMessageFilter);
    }
}

Somehow it only detects Ctrl + Alt + K. Please Read the comment in MessageFilter code.

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See this great blog post about setting up hotkeys in c#

There's also a good article that explains all of this here

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