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Is there another way to write something like this:

if (a == x || a == y || a == z)

One way that I found is doing it like this:

if( new [] {x,y,z}.Contains(a))

Are there other good ways?

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2  
Why do you want it in other ways? I'm just curious –  David Espart Jul 14 '10 at 8:07
    
@despart - It makes a little more sense with descriptive variable names but in either case I would still use the logical operators. –  ChaosPandion Jul 14 '10 at 8:08
    
Probably cause creating an array just to compare more than two numbers feels wrong. –  cHao Jul 14 '10 at 8:08
    
@despart: substitute a with a longer expression that you only want to calculate once. also imagine it's used inside a lambda where you would prefer to not have to introduce a variable, because lambdas are neater in their one-line syntax. in that case the first version cannot be used, and the second, if you ask me, is just hard on the eyes –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 8:10
    
@despart because it would be much less to write –  Omu Jul 14 '10 at 8:10

10 Answers 10

up vote 61 down vote accepted

I often use an extension method that mimics SQLs IN:

public static bool IsIn<T>(this T obj, params T[] collection) {
   return collection.Contains(obj);
}

That way I can do

if(a.IsIn(b, c, d)) { ... }
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2  
It should be noted that this is doing the exact same thing as in your second example, but it tucks the act of arranging it in an array and searching in it out of sight, so that you're left with straightforward readable operations. –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 8:12
2  
You've been too fast! (+1) –  Paolo Tedesco Jul 14 '10 at 8:13
4  
shouldn't it return a boolean? –  TommyA Jul 14 '10 at 8:20
3  
Using params for this is genius. +1! –  tzaman Jul 14 '10 at 8:21
2  
@Gertjan: if a is null, it will return true if any other items in the set are null, but false if no other items in the set are null. it should be noted that you can write string a = null; a.IsIn("a","b") but you cannot write null.IsIn("a","b") because in that case the type cannot be inferred. but that would be nonsensical to write, anyway... –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 8:49

You have the classic switch statement :

switch(a) {
    case x:
    case y:
    case z:
        // Do stuff
        break;
}
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Agreed; this is by far the best way to do this (at least, it's the approach I take). –  Noon Silk Jul 14 '10 at 8:17
2  
Will c# freak out if x, y, and z aren't constants? –  cHao Jul 14 '10 at 8:28
2  
@SiN: huh? no. the switch requires that every case is compile-time constant –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 8:56
1  
@SiN: imgur.com/tfePa.png –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 9:07
2  
@Ray, it doesn't in that you could put some code after the case x: and allow it to fall through to the case y:. As long as there is no code between the cases, its fine. –  Mongus Pong Jul 14 '10 at 10:56

Just for fun:

using System;

static class Program {

    static bool In(this object obj, params object[] values) {
        foreach (object value in values) {
            if (obj.Equals(value)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {
        bool test1 = 3.In(1, 2, 3);
        bool test2 = 5.In(1, 2, 3);
    }
}

But I really think that the best way is to write the plain check

if(a == x || a == y || a == z)

As everybody will understand immediately what it does.

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I went for this solution as well (see my answer), although I strongly recommend you make that generic, to avoid boxing/unboxing. the invocation will still be exactly the same, you don't have to explicitly specify the type parameter, as it will be inferred from usage... –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 8:14
    
@David Hedlund: good point! –  Paolo Tedesco Jul 14 '10 at 8:18
    
+1 haven't seen this pattern of code... :) –  deostroll Jul 14 '10 at 13:33

Your solution to rewrite it as

if( new [] {x,y,z}.Contains(a))

is not a good move.

You've take a simple efficient logical operation, which every programmer easily understands and which contains short-circuiting logic to speed it up and instead you've produced code that requires a moment to understand and which is considerably less efficient.

Sometimes your fellow engineers will prefer it if you don't try to be "clever"!

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I do agree that it would be slower, but Contains would still short-circuit. Well at least any reasonable implementation would that is. –  Brian Gideon Jul 14 '10 at 13:09
    
@Brian Gideon: Contains will short-circuit, sure, so it won't continue with the comparisons if a match is already found, but before Contains can start, you need to initialize the array, and it is at that point that you access x, y and z. if z requires heavy computation to evaluate, and a == x, z will still be evaluated before the Contains operation is even started. –  David Hedlund Jul 14 '10 at 13:41
    
@David: Very good point. –  Brian Gideon Jul 14 '10 at 13:52
    
To be honest the relative efficiency isn't really a major issue on any modern system (excepted possibly an embedded environment). The real issue is the mental stumbling block that odd code like this introduces for other engineers. –  GrahamS Jul 14 '10 at 14:31

Consider a case where a == x, and y and z are slow-to-evaluate, expensive functions.

  • In if(a == x || a == y || a == z) you have the benefit of the short-circuit ||-operator, so you y and z won't be evaluated.
  • If you make an array with new[] { x, y, z } - y and z will be evaluated every time.

The 'trick' with .Contains() would be more useful if there was an elegant syntax to create lazy-evaluated sequence (IEnumerable<T>). i.e. something like yield return x; yield return y;..., but inlined and shorter.

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So, you want to replace a simple, efficent language construct that contains short-circuit optimisations into something much slower that has the potential for throwing exceptions?

However, if the items you want to compare against are not fixed in quantity, i.e. at run time it could be t,u,v,w,x,y,z,etc..., then the Collection.Contains method is the only option, but then you'd be passing collection objects around rather than individual values and so there's little memory allocation ovrehead.

If you've got a large number of items to compare 'a' against, but the items are not dynamic at run time then a switch statement might be a better fit.

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HashSet<T> is what I like to use when dealing with dynamic amounts of comparisons. –  ChaosPandion Jul 14 '10 at 8:20

Why would you need yet another way? Since it isn't a matter of functionality, I would guess the point is to improve readability. If you have a few variables with meaningful names, it would be more readable to just compare by using ==. If you have more, you can use Contains against a list as in your other sample. Yet another way would be comparing against enum flags:

[Flags]
public enum Size
{
    Small = 1,
    Medium = 2,
    Large = 4
}

And then to find out if mySize is in Small or Medium:

selectedSizes = Size.Small | Size.Medium;
mySize = Size.Small;
if (mySize & selectedSizes)
{
  ... 
}
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if(a==x?true:a==y?true:a==z?true:false)
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1  
ooooh interesting, but nowhere near as readable as if(a == x || a == y || a == z) ! –  RYFN Jul 14 '10 at 8:16
6  
I am so conflicted on how to vote. –  ChaosPandion Jul 14 '10 at 8:16

Try this

var res2 = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.Any(x => x == 2);
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For instance, your logic is like that:

if(a==x || a== y|| a==z)
{
    DoSomething();
} 
else
{
   DoOtherThings();
}

will equivalent to:

if(a!=x&& a != y && a!= z)
{
   DoOtherThings();
}
else
{
   DoSomething();
}

Cheers.

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1  
:) that was not the point, You did the same but just a different form, you had to write "a" just once –  Omu Jul 14 '10 at 11:01
    
Misunderstood ! –  Toan Nguyen Jul 14 '10 at 11:21

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