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For the moment my batch file look like this:

myprogram.exe param1

The program start but the Dos Windows still open... how can I close it?

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7 Answers

up vote 43 down vote accepted

You can use the exit keyword. Here is an example from one of my batch files:

start myProgram.exe param1
exit
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5  
Note that this will do not nice things if you are using the console interactively instead of just double-clicking on a batch file. Generally there is little to no need to ever put exit into a batch file. –  Јοеу Apr 19 '11 at 7:34
5  
I tried this command in Win8. I'm not sure if it's different, but note that you must provide it with a Window title as your first parameter. When I would run it the way Patrick described, it would just open a new command prompt with "myProgram.exe" as the window title: start "VPN" "C:\Program Files (x86)\Cisco\Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client\vpnui.exe" –  Adam Plocher May 1 '13 at 6:39
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Look at the START command, you can do this:

START rest-of-your-program-name

For instance, this batch-file will wait until notepad exits:

@echo off
notepad c:\test.txt

However, this won't:

@echo off
start notepad c:\test.txt
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Dude: Just put a empty double quote in front of the program you want to run after "Start"
for example if you want to run Visual Studio 2012 from a batch command

Start ""  "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\devenv.exe"

notice the double quote after start.

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3  
Wow... Anyone know why this works? –  SharkAlley May 28 '13 at 8:40
7  
@SharkAlley The proper format is start <window name> <program name> –  Kruug Sep 25 '13 at 20:37
    
awesome thanks! –  Hituptony May 12 at 16:03
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From my own question:

start /b myProgram.exe params...

works if you start the program from an existing DOS session.

If not, call a vb script

wscript.exe invis.vbs myProgram.exe %*

The Windows Script Host Run() method takes:

  • intWindowStyle : 0 means "invisible windows"
  • bWaitOnReturn : false means your first script does not need to wait for your second script to finish

Here is invis.vbs:

set args = WScript.Arguments
num = args.Count

if num = 0 then
    WScript.Echo "Usage: [CScript | WScript] invis.vbs aScript.bat <some script arguments>"
    WScript.Quit 1
end if

sargs = ""
if num > 1 then
    sargs = " "
    for k = 1 to num - 1
    	anArg = args.Item(k)
    	sargs = sargs & anArg & " "
    next
end if

Set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")

WshShell.Run """" & WScript.Arguments(0) & """" & sargs, 0, False
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Really useful script! –  Dave Andersen Dec 20 '11 at 20:33
1  
+1 There's got to be an easier way, but this is the only answer that worked for me. –  D.N. Mar 6 '12 at 18:49
    
Thanks - that /b flag was exactly what I was looking for. –  a p Jan 23 at 19:59
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You should try this. It starts the program with no window. It actually flashes up for a second but goes away fairly quickly.

start "name" /B myprogram.exe param1
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The "title" option is important. If path of the program includes spaces it has to be enclosed by quotes thus we have to add "title" to avoid failure. –  A.D. Jan 12 '13 at 13:50
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This is the only thing that worked for me when I tried to run a java class from a batch file:

start "cmdWindowTitle" /B "javaw" -cp . testprojectpak.MainForm

You can customize the start command as you want for your project, by following the proper syntax:

Syntax
      START "title" [/Dpath] [options] "command" [parameters]

Key:
   title      : Text for the CMD window title bar (required)
   path       : Starting directory
   command    : The command, batch file or executable program to run
   parameters : The parameters passed to the command

Options:
   /MIN       : Minimized
   /MAX       : Maximized
   /WAIT      : Start application and wait for it to terminate
   /LOW       : Use IDLE priority class
   /NORMAL    : Use NORMAL priority class
   /HIGH      : Use HIGH priority class
   /REALTIME  : Use REALTIME priority class

   /B         : Start application without creating a new window. In this case
                ^C will be ignored - leaving ^Break as the only way to 
                interrupt the application
   /I         : Ignore any changes to the current environment.

   Options for 16-bit WINDOWS programs only

   /SEPARATE   Start in separate memory space (more robust)
   /SHARED     Start in shared memory space (default)
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My solution to do this from the GUI:

  1. Create a shortcut to the program you want to run;

  2. Edit the shortcut's properties;

  3. Change the TARGET field to %COMSPEC% /C "START "" "PROGRAMNAME"";

  4. Change the RUN field to minimized.

Ready! See how you like it...

PS: Program parameters can be inserted in between the two final quotation marks; the PROGRAMNAME string can be either a filename, a relative or an absolute path -- if you put in an absolute path and erase the drive letter and semicolon, then this will work in a thumbdrive no matter what letter the host computer assigns to it... (also, if you place the shortcut in the same folder and precede the program filename in PROGRAMNAME with the %CD% variable, paths will always match; same trick can be used in START IN field).

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