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I would like a C++ editor/IDE with the following features

  • Runs under Linux
  • Split Windows
  • Separate buffer selection for each subwindow
  • Highlighting
  • Auto indentation
  • Code completion
  • Session saving
  • Multiple simultaneous sessions
  • Multiple windows
  • Friendly to custom Makefiles
  • Built-in terminal emulator

I use Jedit like this: http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/5266/jeditsnap.png and quiet satisfied with it but it lacks multiple sessions and terminal emulator. Most of the IDEs I used don't support splitting, or support it poorly, and QTCreator is not very good for non-qt projects.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think all You've written can be achieved using Vim (http://vim.org) however it seems like a pretty hardcore solution.

Other than that you could try Eclipse with CDE plugins.

You can have sessions saved using for example Mylyn's per-task context support. You can run multiple instances of this IDE.

I don't know right now how to do split window, but googling for "eclipse split window" shows pretty much answers to this problem.

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Here is a quick video tutorial: addisu.taddese.com/blog/split-windowview-using-eclipse –  Marcin Cylke Jul 14 '10 at 12:39
    
Not exactly how I wanted it but quiet good. I accepted this answer because of the link you provided. Thanks. –  Atilla Filiz Oct 8 '10 at 12:29

Netbeans

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  dgw Aug 22 '12 at 13:22

Surely Emacs is what you're looking for.

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Tried that, got irritated from repeating too many M-u M-x combos and unable to make it remmeber last setup. Thanks for the answer. –  Atilla Filiz Jul 14 '10 at 12:35
    
Emacs like vim can be a hardcore ide, but be serious, the entry level is so steep! –  Marcin Cylke Jul 14 '10 at 12:37
    
@Atilla Filiz: If you make sure you have menus available then anything you can't remember is accessible through a normal menu just like any other IDE. The main advantage is that you can configure virtually any part of Emacs behaviour just using code (in the .emacs file). –  Amos Jul 14 '10 at 13:56

vim can do all those things.

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You could give Anjuta a try. It's a Gnome application, but works well for any C/C++ programming.

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