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I want to format numbers in my reports to significant digits, but keep trailing significant zeroes and correctly format large numbers

For instance the numbers c(10.00001,12345,1234.5,123.45,1.2345,0.12345) to 3 significant digits should be 10.0, 12300, 1230, 123, 1.23, 0.123 but I get differing results with different methods (and none seem to work universaly.

> numbers<-c(10.00001,12345,1234.5,123.45,1.2345,0.12345)
> for(n in seq(numbers)){
+   print(signif(numbers[n],digits=3))
+   print(format(numbers[n],digits=3))
+   print(formatC(numbers[n], digits=3,format="fg"))
+   print(formatC(numbers[n], digits=3,format="fg", flag="#"))
+   }
[1] 10
[1] "10"
[1] "  10"
[1] "10.0"
[1] 12300
[1] "12345"
[1] "12345"
[1] "12345."
[1] 1230
[1] "1234"
[1] "1234"
[1] "1234."
[1] 123
[1] "123"
[1] " 123"
[1] "123."
[1] 12.3
[1] "12.3"
[1] "12.3"
[1] "12.3"
[1] 1.23
[1] "1.23"
[1] "1.23"
[1] "1.23"
[1] 0.123
[1] "0.123"
[1] "0.123"
[1] "0.123"

Here, signif and format round the 10.00001 result. formatC with flag="#" correctly does the small numbers but not the large numbers.

Is there a better way ?

share|improve this question
    
also try apply, lapply and sapply instead of looping... – Matt Bannert Jul 14 '10 at 12:53
    
I may have a gross conceptual error, but doesn't the apply family of functions still use loops? But it abstracts away the loops for the code is cleaner and easier to read, with less housekeeping. Right? – Richard Herron Jul 14 '10 at 13:29
    
Sorry, the loop is there just to show the results, I originaly had signif(numbers,digits=3) but that defaulted to scientific notation for some reason. – PaulHurleyuk Jul 14 '10 at 14:22
    
It depends on what you mean by your statement. Some of the apply family, in some cases, are looping in C, not R. lapply has optimizations that make it faster than for loops. aggregate(), and tapply() are much faster than loops in R. You also leave your code open for further optimizations. In regards to your initial question, help(format). – John Jul 14 '10 at 17:54
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Sorry I never updated this at the time. None of the statements in my question, or prettynum worked. In the end I used

print(formatC(signif(numbers[n],digits=3), digits=3,format="fg", flag="#"))

which correctly coped with trailing zero's and big numbers.

share|improve this answer
2  
Happy to see that using formatC() was the solution [as I ported that function to R, and notably introduced format = "fg" myself with quite some consideration. Typically, nowadays, sprintf() is often preferred to formatC(), but indeed, I don't see a nice way to get the solution via sprintf() instead of formatC(). BTW: Given your numbers, I found it convenient to use sapply instead of the for loop sapply(numbers, function(N) formatC(signif(N, digits=3), digits=3,format="fg", flag="#")) – Martin Mächler Nov 23 '13 at 17:46

Are you aware of prettyNum() and all its options?

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, cool, Dirk. A nice base option to know about. – isomorphismes Oct 2 '12 at 14:23
    
any tips how to format numeric to character: 1000 -> 1k, 10000 -> 10k, 1000000 -> 1M, 1e7 -> 10M? – jangorecki Oct 21 '14 at 0:43
3  
@Jan there is a pretty new package doing that: prettyunits – Dirk Eddelbuettel Oct 21 '14 at 0:46

A more barebones option is options(), which just does rounding. If you plan on doing this a lot, I suggest checking out Sweave.

> a <- 1.23456789
> options(digits=2)
> a
[1] 1.2
> options(digits=6)
> a
[1] 1.23457
share|improve this answer

If you like scientific notation

> format(2^31-1, scientific = TRUE, digits = 3)
[1] "2.15e+09"
share|improve this answer

Paul Hurley's method above worked well for me for both positive and negative numbers. Below is some code which modifies Paul's solution into a function in which the desired significant figures can be specified.

sigfig <- function(vec, n=3){ 
### function to round values to N significant digits
# input:   vec       vector of numeric
#          n         integer is the required sigfig  
# output:  outvec    vector of numeric rounded to N sigfig

formatC(signif(vec,digits=n), digits=n,format="fg", flag="#") 

}      # end of function   sigfig

to verify it works OK

numbers <- c(50000.01, 1000.001, 10.00001, 12345, 1234.5, 123.45, 1.2345, 0.12345, 0.0000123456, -50000.01, -1000.001,-10.00001, -12345, -1234.5, -123.45, -1.2345, -0.12345, -0.0000123456)
sigfig(numbers)   # defaults to 3
sigfig(numbers, 3)
sigfig(numbers, 1)
sigfig(numbers, 6)
share|improve this answer

Another modification on Paul's answer. It appears that it also leaves a trailing decimal. I am removing it with gsub:

sigfig <- function(vec, digits){
  return(gsub("\\.$", "", formatC(signif(vec,digits=digits), digits=digits, format="fg", flag="#")))
}
share|improve this answer

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