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I used the following piece of code to read data from files as part of a larger program.

double data_read(FILE *stream,int code) {
        char data[8];
        switch(code) {
        case 0x08:
            return (unsigned char)fgetc(stream);
        case 0x09:
            return (signed char)fgetc(stream);
        case 0x0b:
            data[1] = fgetc(stream);
            data[0] = fgetc(stream);
            return *(short*)data;
        case 0x0c:
            for(int i=3;i>=0;i--)
                data[i] = fgetc(stream);
            return *(int*)data;
        case 0x0d:
            for(int i=3;i>=0;i--)
                data[i] = fgetc(stream);
            return *(float*)data;
        case 0x0e:
            for(int i=7;i>=0;i--)
                data[i] = fgetc(stream);
            return *(double*)data;
        }
        die("data read failed");
        return 1;
    }

Now I am told to use -O2 and I get following gcc warning: warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules

Googleing I found two orthogonal answers:

vs

In the end I don't want to ignore the warnings. What would you reccomend?

[update] I substituted the toy example with the real function.

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Your function is returning a double, but you cast your return to an int. Why not cast to double? –  Adam Shiemke Jul 14 '10 at 13:09
    
My reading of the supplied links: bytes.com link appears to be mostly wrong (actually things have changed since GCC 4.x released), while SO link seem to be OK. See C99, "6.5 Expressions", clause 7. –  Dummy00001 Jul 14 '10 at 14:25
    
I'm a bit confused by the error message because I thought aliasing rules excluded char types (i.e. a char pointer is always allowed to alias other pointers unless it's restricted.) Maybe you have to make it unsigned char for that to apply..? I'd be interested in seeing the correct answer. –  R.. Jul 14 '10 at 14:53
    
@R A char * can alias anything but not the other way around. He is casting and dereferencing char to short,int,float and double in the above code. –  5ound Jul 14 '10 at 16:50
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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It looks a lot as if you really want to use fread:

int data;
fread(&data, sizeof(data), 1, stream);

That said, if you do want to go the route of reading chars, then reinterpreting them as an int, the safe way to do it is to use a union:

union
{
    char theChars[4];
    int theInt;
} myunion;

for(int i=0; i<4; i++)
    myunion.theChars[i] = fgetc(stream);
return myunion.theInt;

I'm not sure why the length of data in your original code is 3. I assume you wanted 4 bytes; at least I don't know of any systems where an int is 3 bytes.

Note that both your code and mine are highly non-portable.

Edit: If you want to read ints of various lengths from a file, portably, try something like this:

unsigned result=0;
for(int i=0; i<4; i++)
    result = (result << 8) | fgetc(stream);

(Note: In a real program, you would additionally want to test the return value of fgetc() against EOF.)

This reads a 4-byte unsigned from the file in little-endian format, regardless of what the endianness of the system is. It should work on just about any system where an unsigned is at least 4 bytes.

If you want to be endian-neutral, don't use pointers or unions; use bit-shifts instead.

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6  
+1. To stress again: an union is an official way to keep the code strict aliasing compliant. This is not gcc specific, it's just gcc's optimizer is more broken in the respect. The warnings shouldn't be ignored: either disable explicitly -fstrict-aliasing optimization or fix the code. –  Dummy00001 Jul 14 '10 at 14:17
    
I fixed the '3-byte-int'. Would a union be portable? –  Framester Jul 14 '10 at 16:43
1  
@Framester: Depends on what you want to port to. Most desktop systems and kin mean the same thing by a 32-bit int, but some are big-endian and some are small-endian, meaning the order of the bytes in the int can vary. –  David Thornley Jul 14 '10 at 16:56
    
@David: Just to pick a nit: The usual term is "little-endian". –  Martin B Jul 15 '10 at 8:12
2  
@Dummy00001 "an union is an official way to keep the code strict aliasing compliant." According to who? –  curiousguy Oct 3 '11 at 18:42
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The problem occurs because you access a char-array through a double*:

char data[8];
...
return *(double*)data;

But gcc assumes that your program will never access variables though pointers of different type. This assumption is called strict-aliasing and allows the compiler to make some optimizations:

If the compiler knows that your *(double*) can in no way overlap with data[], it's allowed to all sorts of things like reordering your code into:

return *(double*)data;
for(int i=7;i>=0;i--)
    data[i] = fgetc(stream);

The loop is most likely optimized away and you end up with just:

return *(double*)data;

Which leaves your data[] uninitialized. In this particular case the compiler might be able to see that your pointers overlap, but if you had declared it char* data, it could have given bugs.

But, the strict-aliasing rule says that a char* and void* can point at any type. So you can rewrite it into:

double data;
...
*(((char*)&data) + i) = fgetc(stream);
...
return data;

Strict aliasing warnings are really important to understand or fix. They cause the kinds of bugs that are impossible to reproduce in-house because they occur only on one particular compiler on one particular operating system on one particular machine and only on full-moon and once a year, etc.

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Using a union is not the correct thing to do here. Reading from an unwritten member of the union is undefined - i.e. the compiler is free to perform optimisations that will break your code (like optimising away the write).

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"from an unwritten member of the union is undefined" In this simple case: union U { int i; short s; } u; u.s=1; return u.i;, yes. In general, it depends. –  curiousguy Oct 3 '11 at 20:03
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Basically you can read gcc's message as guy you are looking for trouble, don't say I didn't warn ya.

Casting a three byte character array to an int is one of the worst things I have seen, ever. Normally your int has at least 4 bytes. So for the fourth (and maybe more if int is wider) you get random data. And then you cast all of this to a double.

Just do none of that. The aliasing problem that gcc warns about is innocent compared to what you are doing.

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4  
Hi, I substituted the toy example with the real function. And the int with 3 bytes was just a typo from me. –  Framester Jul 14 '10 at 16:40
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Apparently the standard allows sizeof(char*) to be different from sizeof(int*) so gcc complains when you try a direct cast. void* is a little special in that everything can be converted back and forth to and from void*. In practice I don't know many architecture/compiler where a pointer is not always the same for all types but gcc is right to emit a warning even if it is annoying.

I think the safe way would be

int i, *p = &i;
char *q = (char*)&p[0];

or

char *q = (char*)(void*)p;

You can also try this and see what you get:

char *q = reinterpret_cast<char*>(p);
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3  
reinterpret_cast is C++. This is C. –  ptomato Aug 16 '10 at 8:29
3  
"the standard allows sizeof(char*) to be different from sizeof(int*)" or they could have the same size but different reprsentation, but anyway this has nothing to do with the problem here. This question is about type-punning, not pointer representation. "char *q = (char*)&p[0]" the problem is not how get two pointers of different types to point to the same address. This question is about type-punning, not pointer casts. –  curiousguy Oct 3 '11 at 20:00
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