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The following function will not load:

charName :: a -> String
charName 'a' = "Alpha"
charName 'b' = "Bravo"
charName 'c' = "Charlie"
charName 'd' = "Delta"
charName 'e' = "Echo"
charName 'f' = "Foxtrot"
charName 'g' = "Golf"
charName 'h' = "Hotel"
charName 'i' = "India"
charName 'j' = "Juliet"
charName 'k' = "Kilo"
charName 'l' = "Lima"
charName 'm' = "mike"
charName 'n' = "November"
charName 'o' = "Oscar"
charName 'p' = "Papa"
charName 'q' = "Quebec"
charName 'r' = "Romeo"
charName 's' = "Sierra"
charName 't' = "Tango"
charName 'u' = "Uniform"
charName 'v' = "Victor"
charName 'w' = "Whiskey"
charName 'x' = "X-ray"
charName 'y' = "Yankee"
charName 'z' = "Zulu"
charName 0 = "Zero"
charName 1 = "One"
charName 2 = "Two"
charName 3 = "Three"
charName 4 = "Four"
charName 5 = "Five"
charName 6 = "Six"
charName 7 = "Seven"
charName 8 = "Eight"
charName 9 = "Nine"
charName x = ""

It gives me the following error:

[1 of 1] Compiling Main ( baby.hs, interpreted )

baby.hs:41:9: Couldn't match expected type a' against inferred typeChar' a' is a rigid type variable bound by the type signature forcharName' at baby.hs:40:12 In the pattern: 'a' In the definition of `charName': charName 'a' = "Alpha"

baby.hs:67:9: No instance for (Num Char) arising from the literal 0' at baby.hs:67:9 Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Num Char) In the pattern: 0 In the definition ofcharName': charName 0 = "Zero" Failed, modules loaded: none.

Not sure how I can get this to work. Does anybody have any ideas?

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2  
Your 0, 1, 2... 8, 9 are actually numbers not characters. Try adding '0', '1', '2' to them so they are characters. –  Eric U. Jul 14 '10 at 13:16
4  
This shouldn't be community wiki. –  Christian Jul 14 '10 at 13:16
    
What if I want to accept numbers as input? –  Vanson Samuel Jul 14 '10 at 13:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

With new data type

The simple way to pass either Char or Int as a function argument, is to define a new data type to encapsulate them:

data (Num a) => CharOrNum a = C Char | N a

charName (C 'z') = "Zulu"
charName (N 0) = "Zero"

Then you can use it like

ghci> charName $ C 'z'
"Zulu"
ghci> charName $ N 0
"Zero"

With this change the type of charName is (Num t) => CharOrNum t -> [Char].

With new type class

Another way is to define a common type class for both of the argument types, like Show.

class Nameable a where
  nameit :: a -> String

instance Nameable Char where
  nameit 'z' = "Zulu"
  nameit _ = ""

instance Nameable Integer where
  nameit 0 = "Zero"
  nameit _ = ""

Then you can use it like this:

ghci> (nameit 0, nameit 'z')
("Zero","Zulu")
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This is what I am looking for. Thank You! :-) –  Vanson Samuel Jul 14 '10 at 14:41
    
I have to say that is just too cool! –  Vanson Samuel Jul 14 '10 at 14:45
    
Of course the Nameable is the same as Either , make your own, use a predefined one, choose yourself... I prefer the new type class version, becomes a little less verbose in the long run, and extends beautifully... –  HaskellElephant Jul 15 '10 at 21:00
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The types of the argument in the different cases of charName do not match. Sometimes you use a Char (for example 'a') and sometimes you use a number (for example 9).

There is no way you can make this work by just changing the type signature. (Well, there is one way: add an instance Num Char, but that would be a really bad idea).

The only sane way to achieve what you intended to do is change the numbers to Chars (i.e. '0' instead of 0 etc.).

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I want to be bad how would I add an instance "Num Char" –  Vanson Samuel Jul 14 '10 at 13:52
3  
Actually the first error is not because he is mixing Char and Int, but because charName is declared to have type a -> String so it has to work for all possible a's. –  Daniel Velkov Jul 14 '10 at 14:01
    
djv I am not sure what you mean by that. I believe I am solving for all possible a's with (charName x = "") at the end. –  Vanson Samuel Jul 14 '10 at 14:32
1  
@djv is correct. You are not "solving for all possible a's" because this single definition has to work for every specific a, and it won't typecheck, because most types (that is, all of them except Char) can't be compared for equality to Char. –  Alexey Romanov Jul 14 '10 at 17:06
1  
In fact, the bare type a can't be compared for equality to anything. You'd need an Eq instance for that. –  Chuck Jul 14 '10 at 20:59
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Well, you have to decide on the type of the parameter. Char or Int? charName 'a' to charName 'z' take a Char as a parameter. charName 0 to charName 9 take an Int. and charName x takes ... well, any type.

I'd change charName 0 into charName '0' etc etc and use charName _ = "" to match any other single Char, other than the listed:

...
charName 'y' = "Yankee"
charName 'z' = "Zulu"
charName '0' = "Zero"
...
charName '9' = "Nine"
charName _ = ""

With this changes, the function type is: charName :: Char -> String

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