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How to write this in another (perhaps shorter) way? Is there a better way to initialize an allocated array in C++?

int main(void) {
   int* a;
   a = new int[10];
   for (int i=0; i < 10; ++i) a[i] = 0;
}
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I'm voting to close this because this question is incredibly vague. There are an infinite number of programs that fit the stated criteria. What's your specific problem here? –  Omnifarious Jul 14 '10 at 13:28
    
@equilibrium: I'd question why you need to do this in the first place. –  DeadMG Jul 14 '10 at 14:09
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10 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted
 int *a =new int[10](); // Value initialization

ISO C++ Section 8.5/5

To value-initialize an object of type T means:

— if T is a class type (clause 9) with a user-declared constructor (12.1), then the default constructor for T is called (and the initialization is ill-formed if T has no accessible default constructor);

— if T is a non-union class type without a user-declared constructor, then every non-static data member and base-class component of T is value-initialized;

— if T is an array type, then each element is value-initialized;

otherwise, the object is zero-initialized

For differences between the terms zero initialization, value initialization and default initialization, read this

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3  
This is better because it deals well with arrays of objects and in a template context. But bear in mind that for the simple example given above the generated code is likely to be very similar (perhaps identical). –  dmckee Jul 15 '10 at 19:55
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std::vector<int> vec(10, 0); 
int *a = &vec.front();
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2  
+1 for recommending std::vector –  Prasoon Saurav Jul 14 '10 at 13:28
1  
And the 0 isn't even required, since int() is the default value. –  Roger Pate Jul 16 '10 at 4:58
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You could use memset

Sets the first num bytes of the block of memory pointed by ptr to the specified value (interpreted as an unsigned char).

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3  
Old, I know, but there's really no reason to use memset. std::fill is a more generic way of getting the same thing (which means the code can be consistent) at no loss. –  GManNickG Jul 19 '10 at 20:56
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How about 3 ways?

1.    int *a = new int[10]();

2.    std::vector<int> a(10, 0);

3.    int *a = new int[10];
      memset(a, 0, sizeof(int) * 10);

Due to popular demand, a couple more:

4.    int *a = new int[10];
      std::fill(a, a + 10, 0);

5.    std::vector<int> a(10);
      std::fill(a.begin(), a.end(), 0);
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3  
No ::std::fill? :-) –  Omnifarious Jul 14 '10 at 13:49
    
@Omnifarious: I was actually about to include fill, but I just like the number 3 more than 4. :) –  Justin Ardini Jul 14 '10 at 13:51
    
also int a[10] = {0}; could be an alternative way. –  Nick Dandoulakis Jul 14 '10 at 13:51
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int main(void) { int *a; a = new int[10]; for(int i=0;i<10;++i) a[i]=0; }

;-)

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5  
That has 9 superfluous spaces in it - much too readable! –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 14 '10 at 13:37
1  
you are right: int main(){int i,*a=new int[10];for(i=0;i<10;++i)a[i]=0;} –  nob Jul 15 '10 at 11:59
1  
you are right: int(main)(){int*a=new(int[10])();} –  Roger Pate Jul 16 '10 at 4:59
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#include <algorithm>

int main() {
    int *a = new int[10];
    std::fill(a, a + 10, 0);
}
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int *a = (int*) calloc(10, sizeof(*a));

(and check if is NULL, or rewrite a safe wrapper against calloc).

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Maybe you could try something like this:

int* initIntArray(int size) {
    int *temp = new int[size];
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        temp[i]=0;
    }
    return temp;
}

int main () {
    int* a = initIntArray(10);
    int* b = initIntArray(10);
    int* c = initIntArray(10);

    //do stuff with arrays

    delete [] a;
    delete [] b;
    delete [] c;

    return 0;
}
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is there a reason someone voted down this answer?? i'd like to what I did wrong (seriously!! no sarcasm here) –  jmont Jul 14 '10 at 21:11
    
Your answer seems fine. I don't understand the downvotes either. –  Aaron McDaid Jul 14 '10 at 22:58
    
This is just bad advice; it's nearly an exact copy of std::fill_n with downsides but no benefit. –  Roger Pate Jul 16 '10 at 5:04
    
I didn't down-vote, but I think the problem some may have had is that this doesn't deviate much from the OP's original problem. I think the OP is trying to eliminate writing a for-loop to do the initialization. –  Steve Guidi Jul 25 '10 at 5:07
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I'm a C guy and not too sure what "new" really does, but could this work?


int
main( void ) {
   int i = 10;              // start at the far end of the array
   int *a = new int[10]; 
   while ( i-- ) a[i] = 0;  // while ( i == 9, 8, 7, ... , 0 )
}

Just to show off my new loop-counter favorite: while(condition).

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1  
1) why is i static? 2) Why while instead of the established, idiomatic for? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 14 '10 at 14:27
    
Where is the calloc :P, if you are a C guy ? –  Andrei Ciobanu Jul 14 '10 at 14:28
    
@Konrad: static is zero initialized; and while is different from for. I agree with you, though: outside the scope of this question, I'd be upset with someone who presented the code shown as a good way of doing things. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 14 '10 at 15:02
    
@Andrei, I forgot about calloc, dang it :-) I started trying this technique about 6 mmonths ago; it's beginning to seem cleaner and more obvious. Tons of off-by-one mistakes in the beginning. A somewhat more obscure version:<pre><code> int i = 10; int *a = new int[10]; while ( i-- ) a[i] = 0;</code></pre> –  Pete Wilson Jul 14 '10 at 18:00
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by the way, what about using calloc()? say

int i*=(int[10])calloc(10*sizeof(int))

well i'm just another C guy.. any comment is welcomed here

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Because in C++, people generally use new and if you use calloc you have to use free instead of delete. –  Brendan Long Aug 19 '10 at 17:57
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