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int fkt(int &i)
{
  return i++;
}

int main()
{
  int i = 5;
  printf("%d ", fkt(i));
  printf("%d ", fkt(i));
  printf("%d ", fkt(i));
}

prints '5 6 7 '. Say I want to print '5 7 9 ' like this, is it possible to do it in a similar way without a temporary variable in fkt()? (A temporary variable would marginally decrease efficiency, right?) I.e., something like

return i+=2 

or

return i, i+=2; 

which both first increases i and then return it, what is not what I need.

Thanks

EDIT: The main reason, I do it in a function and not outside is because fkt will be a function pointer. The original function will do something else with i. I just feel that using {int temp = i; i+=2; return temp;} does not seem as nice as {return i++;}.

I don't care about printf, this is just for illustration of the use of the result.

EDIT2: Wow, that appears to be more of a chat here than a traditional board :) Thanks for all the answers. My fkt is actually this. Depending on some condition, I will define get_it as either get_it_1, get_it_2, or get_it_4:

unsigned int (*get_it)(char*&);

unsigned int get_it_1(char* &s)
  {return *((unsigned char*) s++);}
unsigned int get_it_2(char* &s)
  {unsigned int tmp = *((unsigned short int*) s); s += 2; return tmp;}
unsigned int get_it_4(char* &s)
  {unsigned int tmp = *((unsigned int*) s); s += 4; return tmp;}

For get_it_1, it is so simple... I'll try to give more background in the future...

share|improve this question
14  
Ignore those efficiency considerations and use a solution that works. –  Philipp Jul 14 '10 at 14:08
21  
I just want to make sure you realize that printf is thousands of times slower than i+=2. –  Ramónster Jul 14 '10 at 14:08
1  
SadSido is right...i+=2; return i; would be the same. if you think about it, i++ is really just a convenient way of saying i+=1, which is a convenient way of saying i=i+1. (Kind of funny how we programmers have come up with convenient ways to make our convenient ways more convenient) You wouldn't have any overhead because assembly instructions already have an "add immediate" option for addition with integers. No extra registers required! –  rownage Jul 14 '10 at 14:23
3  
Write the code that is easiest to read and maintain first, then measure. If you find performance problems though measuring, locate the areas with the most impact on performance first, then implement what you think are improvements there, then measure again, to see if your guesses were right. –  sbi Jul 14 '10 at 15:00
3  
“We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%.A good programmer will not be lulled into complacency by such reasoning, he will be wise to look carefully at the critical code; but only after that code has been identified” - Donald Kunth -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_optimization –  Jarrod Roberson Jul 14 '10 at 17:29

9 Answers 9

up vote 27 down vote accepted

"A temporary variable would marginally decrease efficiency, right?"

Wrong.

Have you measured it? Please be aware that ++ only has magical efficiency powers on a PDP-11. On most other processors it's just the same as +=1. Please measure the two to see what the actual differences actually are.

share|improve this answer
25  
+1 for magical pdp-11 powers –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 14 '10 at 14:11
2  
There shouldn't be any difference, because of the compiler optimizations... –  Quonux Jul 14 '10 at 14:12
5  
On a PDP-11, compiler optimisations are performed by humans ;) –  Artelius Jul 14 '10 at 14:16
2  
The PDP11's architecture (and many that have come since) could dereference and increment or decrement a pointer in one instruction. Often, the increment/decrement is forced to be the data size being loaded/stored (e.g. 1 if loading/storing a byte, 2 if a 16-bit word, etc.) Different processors support different combinations of pre- and post-increment/decrement. I know of no architecture that directly favors post-increment for anything other than pointer dereferencing, though some highly-pipelined processors might benefit from post-increment in some cases. –  supercat Jul 14 '10 at 16:40
2  
On an old Z80 chip, add was slower than inc :) –  Michael Dorgan Jul 14 '10 at 17:36

(A temporary variable would marginally decrease efficiency, right?)

If that's the main reason you're asking, then you're worrying far too early. Don't second-guess your compiler until you have an actual performance problem.

If you want fkt to be able to add different amounts to i, then you need to pass a parameter. There is no material reason to prefer ++ over +=.

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5  
+1: "you're worrying far too early". –  S.Lott Jul 14 '10 at 14:14
6  
+1: "Don't second-guess your compiler". A good motto for life. –  bgs264 Jul 14 '10 at 14:17

You could increment twice, then subtract, something like:

return (i += 2) - 2

Just answering the question, though, I don't think you should be scared of using a temporary variable.

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1  
Best answer for the actual question. I agree with you and the other answers that the temporary would be better. –  deft_code Jul 14 '10 at 17:31
    
thanks, very clever! –  Frank Seifert Jul 14 '10 at 17:46
2  
As far as efficiency goes, compiling with gcc 4.4.1 -O2 produces the exact same assembly as using a temporary. –  indiv Jul 14 '10 at 18:07

A temporary variable would marginally decrease efficiency, right?

Always take in account "premature optimization is the root of all evil". Spend time on other parts then try to optimize this away. += and ++ will probably result in the same thing. Your PC will manage ;)

share|improve this answer

Well, you could do

return i+=2, i-2;

That said, just follow this simple maxim:

Write code that is easy to understand.

Code that is easy for a human to understand is usually easy for the compiler to understand and hence the compiler can optimise it.

Writing crazy stuff in an effort to optimise your code often just confuses the compiler and makes it harder for the compiler to optimise your code.

I would recommend

int fkt(int &i)
{
    int orig = i;
    i += 2;
    return orig;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The difference in the assembley for these two should be insignificant and the second one is much nicer to read. –  Loki Astari Jul 14 '10 at 14:39
    
+1 for the simple maxim, "Write code that is easy to understand." –  Thomas Matthews Jul 14 '10 at 18:34

If you really need that speed, then check the assembly code the compiler outputs. If you do:

int t = i;
i+=2;
return t;

then the compiler may optimize it while inlining the function into something like:

printf("%d ", i);
i+=2;

Which is as good as it's gonna get.

EDIT: Now you say you're jumping to this function via a function pointer? Calling a function by a pointer is pretty slow compared to using a temporary variable. I'm not certain, but I think I remember the Intel docs saying it's somewhere around 20-30 cpu cycles on Core 2s and i7s, that is if your function code is all in cache. Since the compiler cannot inline your function when it is called by a pointer, the ++ will also create a temporary variable anyways.

share|improve this answer

A "temporary variable" will very unlikely decrease performance, as i++ has to hold the old state internally to (i.e. it implicitly uses what you call a temprorary variable). However, the instruction that is needed to increase by two may be slower than the one used for ++.

You can try:

int fkt(int &i)
{
  ++ii;
  return i++;
}

You can compare this to:

int fkt(int &i)
{
  int t = i;
  i += 2;
  return t;
}

That said, I don't think you should be doing any such performance considerations prematurely.

share|improve this answer

I think what you really want is a functor:

class Fkt
{
   int num;
public:
   Fkt(int i) :num(i-2) {}
   operator()() { num+=2; return num; }
}

int main() 
{ 
  Fkt fkt(5); 
  printf("%d ", fkt()); 
  printf("%d ", fkt()); 
  printf("%d ", fkt()); 
} 
share|improve this answer

What about

int a = 0;
++++a;

Increments +2 without temporary variables.

EDIT: Oops, sorry: didn't notice you want to achieve 5,7,9. This requires temporary variables so prefix notation can't be used.

share|improve this answer
2  
++++a; is illegal. You cannot modify a variable twice between sequence points. –  James Curran Jul 14 '10 at 18:27
    
Does it mean I shall get a compile error? Because I don't. Anyway, I don't see why is illegal to do ++(++i). It seems perfectly legal to me to increase a variable before increase it again. But yo got the exp, so I guess I'm wrong anyway. Waiting for clarification :) –  AkiRoss Jul 14 '10 at 23:42
    
Ok, I think I got it: I thought that prefix increment defined a sequence point, but seems not. So, ++a + ++b is illegal, too? As I read that + operator doesn't define one either. –  AkiRoss Jul 14 '10 at 23:50
    
Sorry, I meant ++a + ++a :) obviously the former wouldn't change the same variable twice. –  AkiRoss Jul 15 '10 at 0:02
1  
++++a; is illegal even without considering sequence points; ++ only applies to lvalues, and the result of ++a is not an lvalue. –  caf Jul 15 '10 at 0:14

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