Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When building an application with a CLI, it is useful to avoid using tokens that are commonly used for shell features.

For example, | is used for piping output of one application to input of the next.

Please supply a complete list of tokens that would need to be escaped to be used?

As a minimum/summary, for each token, please identify the applicable OS/shell(s), a simple explanation of what the token does, and any escape methods.

(Other useful information is welcome, once the above is clear.)

share|improve this question
    
dbr - why remove those tags? Since they do not redirect to command-line they are not the same. (i.e. If someone searches for "cli" they are redirected to the cli tag, and will never find this question) Unless there are other better tags, I see no point to removing them? – Peter Boughton Nov 27 '08 at 21:58
    
I agree- those tags are helpful – warren Nov 27 '08 at 22:07
1  
Tagging becomes useless if you just use every tag that almost fits.. "cli" and "shell" are the same as "command-line", and command-line is by far the most widely used.. Just trying to keep the tag-cloud tidy, is all, but fair enough.. – dbr Nov 28 '08 at 11:52

What about starting with Unix ones

share|improve this answer

Fernando Miguélez has given you an excellent source of information. It is almost easier to stipulate which characters do not have a special meaning. That list would be:

A-Z a-z 0-9 _ - . , / + @

Any other ASCII punctuation character has some special significance, somewhere. Some members of that list have special significance in combination with another character; for example, '$@' and '$-' are both special, but the '$' tells you that, rather than the '@' or '-'.

share|improve this answer
    
What about '=', '%' and ':'? – Jonathan Leffler Nov 28 '08 at 2:39

On Windows and MS-DOS systems, the following are invalid filenames:

CON, PRN, AUX, CLOCK$, NUL
COM0, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6, COM7, COM8, COM9
LPT0, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, LPT4, LPT5, LPT6, LPT7, LPT8, LPT9

In the rare cases where you can work around this restriction and create such files, you will encounter problems trying to access or view them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.