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I've got an .rpt file that I did not write and can find no documentation about. I want to be able to review the SQL that is generated from this report so that I can figure out, well, what data it was pulling and what WHERE clause parameters were used.

I can open it up and see the report layout. But when I select Database|Show SQL Query... the report tries to connect to the data source. The problem is, the data source being used is unknown to me, probably an ODBC connection used by whoever wrote the query. All I can do at that stage is 'Cancel' and I'm back to looking at the report designer.

Am I missing something? Can I get to the SQL query without connecting to the datasource? It seems like viewing the selection criteria shouldn't be dependent on a data connection.

Thanks.

version: Crystal Reports 2008

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Thanks - this answered my own question - how to view the SQL! – Chris Halcrow May 12 '14 at 22:57

I know that this is an old thread, but I encountered this same problem. Effectively we used to have a database/application that has since been aquired by an external agency.

Although they now have the database/application they don't have access to crystal reports, so we can't just send them the old report that we used to run. Likewise we can't run it as we don't even have the database set up anywhere.... So instead our plan was just to extract the SQL code generated by the report and forward that on.

We experienced the same problem, but the solution is actually pretty simple. If you don't have access to the original data source, just create a new 'blank' datasource (such as an ODBC connection). As long as the connection to the datasource works (i.e. it is some kind of valid datasource this it works fine). When running the 'Show SQL' option point the report to this datasource. As long as you don't try to actually run the report (and only show the SQL) the operation wont fail. This worked for our situation anyway. (Crystal Reports 2008)

(I can give more details if it helps in any way.)

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It should be possible to find out some details about the existing datasource, by selecting Database > Set Datasource Location... .

As well as enabling you to change the datasource location, this should show you some information about the current datasource, such as which type of datasource is being used, and possibly (dependant on the type of driver) the name of the database. It is likely to be less helpful if (as you surmise) the datasource is ODBC, but if it uses a native driver there may be something useful.

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+1 This is would be my first action. My second action would be to go into the database expert (as LittleBobbyTables said). Between those 2 options, you should have a clear idea of the data source. – PowerUser Jul 23 '10 at 20:50

Without the password, I'm not sure how much you can do. It seems "Show SQL Query" requires to report to run first, then generate the SQL plan.

It's not ideal, but you could go to Database > Visual Linking Expert to at least see the tables and how they are joined, and the go to the Record Selection Formula Editor and see what the custom WHERE statements are.

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Viewing the SQL of a Command in a Crystal Report File

There are times you have just the report file, but not the associated database structure that the report uses. This is common when dealing with example reports of functionality you wish to mimic. This is a workaround ONLY to allow you to see the SQL of a Command that a Crystal Report is based on, when you don't have the underlying database connection that the report is based on. In essence, the dialog box has to be satisfied before it will show the SQL, so we fool it with a legitimate Data Source, just not one that would work with the SQL that is actually in the SQL Command.

Why does a report use a command? Doesn't Crystal Reports have the ability to link tables? When a Crystal Report is based on a record set that is too complex for the table linking functionality within Crystal Reports, the report can instead be based on a SQL Query, usually developed/tested in another editor tool and pasted into the command. This allows advanced SQL functions to be utilized.

If you don't already have a Data Source on your computer set up that you can connect to, you will need to build one first.

A simple Microsoft Access .mdb file saved in a simple location will suffice. I placed mine with the path C:\A_test\test.mdb to make it easy to find. If you don't have one, google for a sample mdb file and download it, saving it with a name and location you can remember. (You won't ever actually open this file, but just connect to it.) Once you have the file saved, open the ODBC Administrator and create a New Data Source. (you can get to the ODBC Administrator quickly from Start > type ODBC in the Search) On the User DSN tab, click the Add button. Scroll down the driver list to Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb), select it and click the Finish button. In the Data Source Name box, type a name (I used MyTest). Click the Select Button and select the mdb file you saved from a previous step, click OK. Click OK again. You will see your new Data Source listed by the name you gave it. Click OK. You now have the data source you will need for the next steps.

  1. Open the Crystal Report you want to see the SQL command for, and click on Database Expert button or Database>Database Expert Menu.
  2. Under Selected Tables, right click on the Command and choose View Command
  3. The Data Source Selection Box appears. Select the Data Source you created (or one you already use) and click the Finish button. The View Command box should open with the SQL in the left pane. Copy the SQL into your favorite text editor.
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