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If I have a for loop which is nested within another, how can I efficiently come out of both loops (inner and outer) in the quickest possible way?

I don't want to have to use a boolean and then have to say go to another method, but rather just to execute the first line of code after the outer loop.

What is a quick and nice way of going about this?

Thanks


I was thinking that exceptions aren't cheap/should only be thrown in a truly exceptional condition etc. Hence I don't think this solution would be good from a performance perspective.

I don't feel it it is right to take advantage of the newer features in .NET (anon methods) to do something which is pretty fundamental.

Because of that, tvon (sorry can't spell full username!) has a nice solution.

Marc: Nice use of anon methods, and this too is great but because I could be in a job where we don't use a version of .NET/C# that supports anon methods, I need to know a traditional approach too.

share|improve this question
    
I just wanted to make sure: why do you want to do this? – Jon Limjap Dec 20 '08 at 15:56
1  
Why don't you want to use a boolean? What's wrong with doing that? – Anthony Dec 20 '08 at 17:22

19 Answers 19

up vote 107 down vote accepted

Well, "goto", but that is ugly... and not always possible. You can also place the loops into a method (or an anon-method) and use "return" to exit back to the main code.

        // goto
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
            {
                goto Foo; // yeuck!
            }
        }
    Foo:
        Console.WriteLine("Hi");

        // anon-method
        Action work = delegate
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < 100; x++)
            {
                for (int y = 0; y < 100; y++)
                {
                    return; // exits anon-method
                }
            }
        };
        work(); // execute anon-method
        Console.WriteLine("Hi");
share|improve this answer
30  
In this type of situation I don't think using goto is any worse than the normal use of something like break (after all they're both just unconditional branches to a label, it's just that with break the label is implicit). – Greg Beech Nov 28 '08 at 0:07
17  
sometimes goto is less evil than the alternatives – seanb Nov 28 '08 at 0:23
48  
GOTO is good and fine. This is why it exists in the C# (and mostly all) languages. I think it's just "cool to not like GOTO". BTW, this is the answer :) – Timothy Khouri Nov 28 '08 at 3:01
5  
@BeowulfOF - break will only break out of the inner loop, not the inner and outer loops. – Greg Beech Feb 2 '09 at 21:54
17  
Goto itself isn't ugly. What is ugly is abusing goto which results in spaghetti code. Using goto to break out of nested loop is perfectyly ok. Besides, note that all break, continue and return, from structural programming point of view, are hardly better than goto - basically they're the same thing, just in nicer packaging. That's why pure structural languages (such as original Pascal) lack all of three. – el.pescado Apr 4 '10 at 15:28

Don't know if it works in C#, but in C I often do this:

    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
        {
            if (exit_condition)
            {
                // cause the outer loop to break:
                i = INT_MAX;
                Console.WriteLine("Hi");
                // break the inner loop
                break;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
It works in c#, thanks. – inspite Dec 20 '08 at 15:53
1  
@blizpasta So? If he makes the condition on the outer loop false (like he did), it will exit both. – Patrick Mar 23 '11 at 1:23
35  
you should use i = INT_MAX - 1; otherwise i++ == INT_MIN < 100 and loop will continue – Meta May 4 '11 at 11:04
3  
any idea on foreach? – ktutnik May 31 '13 at 8:23
1  
@ktutnik It won't work with foreach because you won't have code access to the hidden enumerator. Also IEnumerator doesn't have some "MoveToEnd" method. – LonelyPixel Jun 27 '14 at 8:30

For people who found this question via other languages, Javascript, Java, and D allows labeled breaks and continues:

outer: while(fn1())
{
   while(fn2())
   {
     if(fn3()) continue outer;
     if(fn4()) break outer;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
18  
its sad this can not been done with c#, it would in so many times produce cleaner code. – Rickard May 11 '12 at 20:39
8  
I actually became excited for a second until I realized this was NOT for c#. :( – Arvo Bowen Jul 22 '13 at 21:36
1  
This concept is also for PowerShell in case somebody comes across the problem there. (They just put the colon in front of the label name.) Now I know this isn't PowerShell-specific... This syntax would be incompatible with the goto labels available in C#. PHP uses something else: break 3; Put the number of levels after the break statement. – LonelyPixel Jun 27 '14 at 8:33

Use a suitable guard in the outer loop. Set the guard in the inner loop before you break.

bool exitedInner = false;

for (int i = 0; i < N && !exitedInner; ++i) {

    .... some outer loop stuff

    for (int j = 0; j < M; ++j) {

        if (sometest) {
            exitedInner = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (!exitedInner) {
       ... more outer loop stuff
    }
}

Or better yet, abstract the inner loop into a method and exit the outer loop when it returns false.

for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) {

    .... some outer loop stuff

    if (!doInner(i, N, M)) {
       break;
    }

    ... more outer loop stuff
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Except the OP said "I don't want to have to use a boolean". – LeopardSkinPillBoxHat Nov 28 '08 at 0:09
    
I read "boolean and goto" -- doesn't use a goto. – tvanfosson Nov 28 '08 at 0:11
    
Very Pascal-ish...I'd probably rather use a goto, though I ordinarily avoid them like the plague. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 28 '08 at 1:36

Is it possible to refactor the nested for loop into a private method? That way you could simply 'return' out of the method to exit the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
With the side benefit of making your original method shorter :-) – Martin Capodici Oct 29 '12 at 22:54
    
C++11 lambdas make this easy for some cases: [&] { ... return; ... }(); – BCS Jun 27 '14 at 17:29

Don't quote me on this, but you could use goto as suggested in the MSDN. There are other solutions, as including a flag that is checked in each iteration of both loops. Finally you could use an exception as a really heavyweight solution to your problem.

GOTO:

for ( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
   for ( int j = 0; j < 10; ++j ) {
      // code
      if ( break_condition ) goto End;
      // more code
   }
}
End: ;

Condition:

bool exit = false;
for ( int i = 0; i < 10 && !exit; ++i ) {
   for ( int j = 0; j < 10 && !exit; ++j ) {
      // code
      if ( break_condition ) {
         exit = true;
         break; // or continue
      }
      // more code
   }
}

Exception:

try {
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10 && !exit; ++i ) {
       for ( int j = 0; j < 10 && !exit; ++j ) {
          // code
          if ( break_condition ) {
             throw new Exception()
          }
          // more code
       }
    }
catch ( Exception e ) {}
share|improve this answer
1  
these are all hacky workarounds where it would be super clean to just factor into a method and use early return – Dustin Getz Nov 28 '08 at 0:09
2  
:) right, that is a simple solution, but you will have to pass all required local data into the method as arguments... This is one of the few places where goto might be the appropriate solution – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 28 '08 at 0:17
    
The Condition method doesn't even work because "more code" will be executed one time after exiting the inner loop before exiting the outer loop. The GOTO method works but does exactly what the poster said they don't want to do. The Exception method works but is uglier and slower than GOTO. – Windows programmer Nov 28 '08 at 0:43
    
I would highlight that semicolon after the label. This way that label can be even at the end of a block. +1 – Tamas Hegedus Jan 4 at 0:28

factor into a function/method and use early return, or rearrange your loops into a while-clause. goto/exceptions/whatever are certainly not appropriate here.

def do_until_equal():
  foreach a:
    foreach b:
      if a==b: return
share|improve this answer
    
Simple, concise. I like it. – dviljoen Dec 20 '08 at 17:41

You asked for a combination of quick, nice, no use of a boolean, no use of goto, and C#. You've ruled out all possible ways of doing what you want.

The most quick and least ugly way is to use a goto.

share|improve this answer

Sometimes nice to abstract the code into it's own function and than use an early return - early returns are evil though : )

public void GetIndexOf(Transform transform, out int outX, out int outY)
{
    outX = -1;
    outY = -1;

    for (int x = 0; x < Columns.Length; x++)
    {
        var column = Columns[x];

        for (int y = 0; y < column.Transforms.Length; y++)
        {
            if(column.Transforms[y] == transform)
            {
                outX = x;
                outY = y;

                return;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but then this allows for the traditional solution asked by OP – Surya Pratap Apr 23 '14 at 9:49

Depending on your situation, you may be able to do this, but only if your not executing code AFTER the inner loop.

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
    {
        i = 100;
        break;
    }
}

It's not elegent, but it may be the easiest solution depending on your problem.

share|improve this answer

I've seen a lot of examples that use "break" but none that use "continue".

It still would require a flag of some sort in the inner loop:

while( some_condition )
{
    // outer loop stuff
    ...

    bool get_out = false;
    for(...)
    {
        // inner loop stuff
        ...

        get_out = true;
        break;
    }

    if( get_out )
    {
        some_condition=false;
        continue;
    }

    // more out loop stuff
    ...

}
share|improve this answer

Since I first saw break in C a couple of decades back, this problem has vexed me. I was hoping some language enhancement would have an extension to break which would work thus:

break; // our trusty friend, breaks out of current looping construct.
break 2; // breaks out of the current and it's parent looping construct.
break 3; // breaks out of 3 looping constructs.
break all; // totally decimates any looping constructs in force.
share|improve this answer
2  
Then a maintenance programmer will insert another level of nesting, will fix some of the break statements, and will break some of the other break statements. The fix for that is to break to a label instead. That has really been proposed, but pragmatists use goto a label instead. – Windows programmer Nov 28 '08 at 6:46
    
Wait, who does maintenance programming any more? :) – Jesse C. Slicer Nov 29 '08 at 0:00
1  
On a side note, PHP offers the ability to do this. php.net/break – Chris Bartow Dec 20 '08 at 17:08
2  
JavaScript even has labeled blocks/break statements. devguru.com/Technologies/ecmascript/quickref/break.html – David Grant Dec 20 '08 at 17:54
    
@Chris Bartow: cool! made my Christmas :) @David Grant: so it seems JS break == C's goto? – Jesse C. Slicer Dec 22 '08 at 14:58

I remember from my student days that it was said it's mathematically provable that you can do anything in code without a goto (i.e. there is no situation where goto is the only answer). So, I never use goto's (just my personal preference, not suggesting that i'm right or wrong)

Anyways, to break out of nested loops I do something like this:

var isDone = false;
for (var x in collectionX) {
    for (var y in collectionY) {
        for (var z in collectionZ) {
            if (conditionMet) {
                // some code
                isDone = true;
            }
            if (isDone)
                break;
        }
        if (isDone) 
            break;
    }
    if (isDone)
        break;
}

... i hope that helps for those who like me are anti-goto "fanboys" :)

share|improve this answer
    
much less readable than goto – JoelFan Nov 27 '14 at 18:22

Throw a custom exception which goes out outter loop.

It works for for,foreach or while or any kind of loop and any language that uses try catch exception block

try 
{
   foreach (object o in list)
   {
      foreach (object another in otherList)
      {
         // ... some stuff here
         if (condition)
         {
            throw new CustomExcpetion();
         }
      }
   }
}
catch (CustomException)
{
   // log 
}
share|improve this answer

As i see you accepted the answer in which the person refers you goto statement, where in modern programming and in expert opinion goto is a killer, we called it a killer in programming which have some certain reasons, which i will not discuss it over here at this point, but the solution of your question is very simple, you can use a Boolean flag in this kind of scenario like i will demonstrate it in my example:

            for (; j < 10; j++)
            {
                //solution
                bool breakme = false;
                for (int k = 1; k < 10; k++)
                {
                   //place the condition where you want to stop it
                    if ()
                    {
                        breakme = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }

                if(breakme)
                    break;
               }

simple and plain. :)

share|improve this answer

It seems to me like people dislike a goto statement a lot, so I felt the need to straighten this out a bit.

I believe the 'emotions' people have about goto eventually boil down to understanding of code and (misconceptions) about possible performance implications. Before answering the question, I will therefore first go into some of the details on how it's compiled.

As we all know, C# is compiled to IL, which is then compiled to assembler using an SSA compiler. I'll give a bit of insights into how this all works, and then try to answer the question itself.

From C# to IL

First we need a piece of C# code. Let's start simple:

foreach (var item in array)
{
    // ... 
    break;
    // ...
}

I'll do this step by step to give you a good idea of what happens under the hood.

First translation: from foreach to the equivalent for loop (Note: I'm using an array here, because I don't want to get into details of IDisposable -- in which case I'd also have to use an IEnumerable):

for (int i=0; i<array.Length; ++i)
{
    var item = array[i];
    // ...
    break;
    // ...
}

Second translation: the for and break is translated into an easier equivalent:

int i=0;
while (i < array.Length)
{
    var item = array[i];
    // ...
    break;
    // ...
    ++i;
}

And third translation (this is the equivalent of the IL code): we change break and while into a branch:

    int i=0; // for initialization

startLoop:
    if (i >= array.Length) // for condition
    {
        goto exitLoop;
    }
    var item = array[i];
    // ...
    goto exitLoop; // break
    // ...
    ++i;           // for post-expression
    goto startLoop; 

While the compiler does these things in a single step, it gives you insight into the process. The IL code that evolves from the C# program is the literal translation of the last C# code. You can see for yourself here: https://dotnetfiddle.net/QaiLRz (click 'view IL')

Now, one thing you have observed here is that during the process, the code becomes more complex. The easiest way to observe this is by the fact that we needed more and more code to ackomplish the same thing. You might also argue that foreach, for, while and break are actually short-hands for goto, which is partly true.

From IL to Assembler

The .NET JIT compiler is an SSA compiler. I won't go into all the details of SSA form here and how to create an optimizing compiler, it's just too much, but can give a basic understanding about what will happen. For a deeper understanding, it's best to start reading up on optimizing compilers (I do like this book for a brief introduction: http://ssabook.gforge.inria.fr/latest/book.pdf ) and LLVM (llvm.org).

Every optimizing compiler relies on the fact that code is easy and follows predictable patterns. In the case of FOR loops, we use graph theory to analyze branches, and then optimize things like cycli in our branches (e.g. branches backwards).

However, we now have forward branches to implement our loops. As you might have guessed, this is actually one of the first steps the JIT is going to fix, like this:

    int i=0; // for initialization

    if (i >= array.Length) // for condition
    {
        goto endOfLoop;
    }

startLoop:
    var item = array[i];
    // ...
    goto endOfLoop; // break
    // ...
    ++i;           // for post-expression

    if (i >= array.Length) // for condition
    {
        goto startLoop;
    }

endOfLoop:
    // ...

As you can see, we now have a backward branch, which is our little loop. The only thing that's still nasty here is the branch that we ended up with due to our break statement. In some cases, we can move this in the same way, but in others it's there to stay.

So why does the compiler do this? Well, if we can unroll the loop, we might be able to vectorize it. We might even be able to proof that there's just constants being added, which means our whole loop could vanish into thin air. To summarize: by making the patterns predictable (by making the branches predictable), we can proof that certain conditions hold in our loop, which means we can do magic during the JIT optimization.

However, branches tend to break those nice predictable patterns, which is something optimizers therefore kind-a dislike. Break, continue, goto - they all intend to break these predictable patterns- and are therefore not really 'nice'.

You should also realize at this point that a simple foreach is more predictable then a bunch of goto statements that go all over the place. In terms of (1) readability and (2) from an optimizer perspective, it's both the better solution.

Another thing worth mentioning is that it's very relevant for optimizing compilers to assign registers to variables (a process called register allocation). As you might know, there's only a finite number of registers in your CPU and they are by far the fastest pieces of memory in your hardware. Variables used in code that's in the inner-most loop, are more likely to get a register assigned, while variables outside of your loop are less important (because this code is probably hit less).

Help, too much complexity... what should I do?

The bottom line is that you should always use the language constructs you have at your disposal, which will usually (implictly) build predictable patterns for your compiler. Try to avoid strange branches if possible (specifically: break, continue, goto or a return in the middle of nothing).

The good news here is that these predictable patterns are both easy to read (for humans) and easy to spot (for compilers).

One of those patterns is called SESE, which stands for Single Entry Single Exit.

And now we get to the real question.

Imagine that you have something like this:

// a is a variable.

for (int i=0; i<100; ++i) 
{
  for (int j=0; j<100; ++j)
  {
     // ...

     if (i*j > a) 
     {
        // break everything
     }
  }
}

The easiest way to make this a predictable pattern is to simply eliminate the if completely:

int i, j;
for (i=0; i<100 && i*j <= a; ++i) 
{
  for (j=0; j<100 && i*j <= a; ++j)
  {
     // ...
  }
}

In other cases you can also split the method into 2 methods:

// Outer loop in method 1:

for (i=0; i<100 && processInner(i); ++i) 
{
}

private bool processInner(int i)
{
  int j;
  for (j=0; j<100 && i*j <= a; ++j)
  {
     // ...
  }
  return i*j<=a;
}

Temporary variables? Good, bad or ugly?

You might even decide to return a boolean from within the loop (but I personally prefer the SESE form because that's how the compiler will see it and I think it's cleaner to read).

Some people think it's cleaner to use a temporary variable, and propose a solution like this:

bool more = true;
for (int i=0; i<100; ++i) 
{
  for (int j=0; j<100; ++j) 
  {
     // ...
     if (i*j > a) { more = false; break; } // yuck.
     // ...
  }
  if (!more) { break; } // yuck.
  // ...
}
// ...

I personally am opposed to this approach. Look again on how the code is compiled. Now think about what this will do with these nice, predictable patterns. Get the picture?

Right, let me spell it out. What will happen is that:

  • The compiler will write out everything as branches.
  • As an optimization step, the compiler will do data flow analysis in an attempt to remove the strange more variable that only happens to be used in control flow.
  • If succesful, the variable more will be eliminated from the program, and only branches remain. These branches will be optimized, so you will get only a single branch out of the inner loop.
  • If unsuccesful, the variable more is definitely used in the inner-most loop, so if the compiler won't optimize it away, it has a high chance to be allocated to a register (which eats up valuable register memory).

So, to summarize: the optimizer in your compiler will go into a hell of a lot of trouble to figure out that more is only used for the control flow, and in the best case scenario will translate it to a single branch outside of the outer for loop.

In other words, the best case scenario is that it will end up with the equivalent of this:

for (int i=0; i<100; ++i) 
{
  for (int j=0; j<100; ++j)
  {
     // ...
     if (i*j > a) { goto exitLoop; } // perhaps add a comment
     // ...
  }
  // ...
}
exitLoop:

// ...

My personal opinion on this is quite simple: if this is what we intended all along, let's make the world easier for both the compiler and readability, and write that right away.

tl;dr:

Bottom line:

  • Use a simple condition in your for loop if possible. Stick to the high-level language constructs you have at your disposal as much as possible.
  • If everything fails and you're left with either goto or bool more, prefer the former.
share|improve this answer
         bool breakInnerLoop=false
        for(int i=0;i<=10;i++)
        {
          for(int J=0;i<=10;i++)
          {
              if(i<=j)
                {
                    breakInnerLoop=true;
                    break;
                }
          }
            if(breakInnerLoop)
            {
            continue
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
What's the essential difference with dviljoen's answer? – Gert Arnold Aug 10 '12 at 12:50
    
That will not work, because you do not check the "breakInnerLoop" condition in the outer for loop, so you just iterate to the next loop, also you wrote j and J, and missed a semicolon, that will not compile. – Sebastian Apr 28 at 13:42

Did you even look at the break keyword? O.o

This is just pseudo-code, but you should be able to see what I mean:

<?php
for(...) {
    while(...) {
        foreach(...) {
            break 3;
        }
    }
}

If you think about break being a function like break(), then it's parameter would be the number of loops to break out of. As we are in the third loop in the code here, we can break out of all three.

Manual: http://php.net/break

share|improve this answer
7  
Not a php question. – Zerga Jan 6 '14 at 16:10

I think unless you want to do the "boolean thing" the only solution is actually to throw. Which you obviously shouldn't do..!

share|improve this answer

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