Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

ok, easier to read version of the code (I hope)

class First
  attr_accessor :addresses

  def initialize

    address

  end


  def address

        @addresses= []

      File.open("/RubyDev/useful/lib/list/listtest.txt").each_line do |i|

        @addresses << i.chomp

          end
  end

end

  class Server1
     b = Last.new
    puts "Im Server1"
    puts "Sending the following address to: #{b.loopaddress}"
  end

   class Server2
     b = Last.new.loopaddress
    puts "Im Server2"
     puts "Sending the following address to: #{b.loopaddress}"
  end

class Last
  n=First.new

  email_servers=[Server1.new,Server2.new]

  def loopaddress
  n.addresses.each_with_index do |i|
            i % email_servers.length
          end

  end

end

Just trying to make the looped addresses be distributed uniquely one at a time between both servers. Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
A block in each_with_index receives two parameters, an element and its index. –  Mladen Jablanović Jul 14 '10 at 18:47
    
Thanks, good to know –  rahrahruby Jul 14 '10 at 21:03
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This algorithm ought to work:

#!/usr/bin/ruby1.8

addresses = (1..10).to_a    # Your list of addresses goes here
servers = (1..2).to_a       # Your list of servers goes here
addresses.each.with_index do |address, i|
  server = servers[i % servers.length]
  puts "Sending address #{address} to server #{server}" 
end

# => Sending address 1 to server 1
# => Sending address 2 to server 2
# => Sending address 3 to server 1
# => Sending address 4 to server 2
# => Sending address 5 to server 1
# => Sending address 6 to server 2
# => Sending address 7 to server 1
# => Sending address 8 to server 2
# => Sending address 9 to server 1
# => Sending address 10 to server 2

Edited to add: I wouldn't create more classes just because "classes are good, m'kay?" I'd do it because, for example, a method takes an object as its argument and operates repeatedly on that object; that method probably ought to be moved to that object. That said, addresses could possibly stand to be its own object:

class Addresses

  def initialize
    @addresses = (1..10).to_a    # Or read from a file, or whatever
  end

  def send_to_servers(servers)
    @addresses.each.with_index do |address, i|
      server = servers[i % servers.length]
      puts "Sending address #{address} to server #{server}"
    end
  end

end

servers = (1..2).to_a       # Your list of servers goes here
addresses = Addresses.new
addresses.send_to_servers(servers)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks wayne, could you put the servers and addresses in classes? That is were I'm having the hangup. –  rahrahruby Jul 14 '10 at 20:54
    
Thanks a lot. I appreciate the answer and the time you took to produce it. –  rahrahruby Jul 14 '10 at 21:51
    
@MAP, It was my pleasure! –  Wayne Conrad Jul 14 '10 at 22:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.