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Which native server is best, in your opinion, to implement long-polling / Comet? The first target application is chat, but there will be other implementations - we basically need push-to-client capabilities.

I'm limiting the answers to C# or Java because these two technologies are dominant at my workplace. The requirements are as usual: performance, ease of deployment/programming, customization, ...

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6 Answers 6

IIS + WebSync is a very straight-forward, scalable and extensible solution for server push. There is a free Community edition I highly recommend checking out.

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Both Java and .NET platforms have enough capabilities to handle your needs. If you choose Java : You may start with DWR otherwise, on the .net side PokeIn library should be the choice.

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DWR with Apache for JAVA | PokeIn with IIS/Apache/Ngix for .NET would be best –  Zuuum Oct 23 '10 at 2:52

I just saw this blogpost from Scott Hanselman yesterday. It looks very promising.

http://www.hanselman.com/blog/AsynchronousScalableWebApplicationsWithRealtimePersistentLongrunningConnectionsWithSignalR.aspx

It features an opensource product called SignalR which is available through nuget.

You can find an example chat application in the sources @ github

https://github.com/SignalR/SignalR

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SignalR would be the best choice if .NET. Also in the ASP.net webstack –  TryingToImprove Nov 15 '12 at 21:08

I don't think there's a significant difference in this regard.

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Try netty-socketio project. It's a Java framework with long-pooling and websocket support using famous Socket.IO protocol.

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I know that special attention was paid to Comet support in the Grizzly engine used by Glassfish. It wasn't treated as an afterthought.

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That's interesting. What sort of special support does it have? –  Steven Sudit Jul 14 '10 at 20:02

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