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I made a program which removes spaces and makes a string upper case by preprocessor directives .its not changing to uppercase

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
# define TOUPPER(x) (x-32)
void main(void)
{
    int i,j;
    char str[100],*p;
    clrscr();
    printf("Enter the string:\n");
    gets(str);
    for(i=0;    ;i++)
    {
        if(str[i]=='\0')
        break;
        if(str[i]==' ')
        {
            for(j=i;    ;j++)
            {
             str[j]=str[j+1];
             if(str[j]=='\0')
             break;
            }
         }
         if(str[i]<='a'||str[i]>='z')
         {
            *p=str[i];
            TOUPPER('p');

         }


        }
        puts(str);
    getch();
}
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1  
Is there a particular reason why you aren't using the islower and toupper library functions? –  John Bode Jul 14 '10 at 20:52
    
I am told to do by preprocessor directives. (Preprocessor directives work faster than functions) –  Fahad Uddin Jul 15 '10 at 6:23
    
Thanks alot!As much as my knowledege says something like this should also work: TOUPPER(&str[i]); but it never does work. –  Fahad Uddin Jul 15 '10 at 6:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its because you do

TOUPPER('p');

and it is defined as

(x-32)

This changes 'p' to upper-case but don't save it.

You need to change you define like this

#define TOUPPER(x) ((*x)=((*x)-32))

just do call it like this:

TOUPPER(p);
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Your TOUPPER('p') does exactly what it should, nothing. You're subtracting 32 from the numeric value of 'p' and then throwing it away. Note that I'm referring to 'p' the character, not p the pointer.

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Thanks alot!As much as my knowledege says something like this should also work: TOUPPER(&str[i]); but it never does work. –  Fahad Uddin Jul 15 '10 at 6:25

Problem is wrong range condition, Macro call with constant argument and you are not assigning the value back.

if(str[i]<='a'||str[i]>='z')
         {
            *p=str[i];
            TOUPPER('p');

         }

Correction:

if(str[i]>='a'||str[i]<='z')
         {
            str[i] = TOUPPER(str[i]);
         }
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+1, I overlooked the range condition issue! –  Doc Brown Jul 14 '10 at 21:09

Perhaps this is what you wanted:

str[i]=TOUPPER(str[i])

(And don't mess around with those pointer p)

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This isn't what you're asking, but please note you have a serious pointer error in your program:

char str[100],*p;

  ...

if(str[i]<='a'||str[i]>='z')
     {
        *p=str[i];
        TOUPPER('p');

     }

The pointer p is uninitialized (can be pointing to anywhere in memory), and you are assigning the character str[i] to that pointer's memory location. p might be equal to 0x00000000 or 0xCDCDCDCD or something else, but in any case you are writing str[i] to that location without initializing p to an appropriate address.

If you feel you must use pointers, you could do it this way (still doesn't fix the range issue that others mentioned, the <= and >= are backwards):

if (str[i]<='a'||str[i]>='z')
{
   p=&str[i]; // p now points to the address of str[i]
   *p = TOUPPER(*p); // p = the address, *p = the contents of that address
}
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Don't believe that using preprocessor macros is always faster than using the functions from <ctype.h>. It is highly probable that these functions are in fact implemented as preprocessor macros themselves. Just write code that is easy to understand, and only "optimize" it if it is necessary.

#include <conio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

static void
str_toupper(char *str)
{
    char *p;

    for (p = str; *p != '\0'; p++) {
        if (isspace((unsigned char) *p)) {
            memmove(p + 0, p + 1, strlen(p) - 1);
        }
        *p = toupper((unsigned char) *p);
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    char str[100];

    clrscr();
    printf("Enter the string:\n");
    if (fgets(str, sizeof str, stdin) == NULL)
        return 0;

    str_toupper(str);

    printf("%s\n", str);
    getch();
    return 0;
}
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