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I'm a big fan of functional programming in general, Schemes in particular, and PLT-Racket ideally. I am wondering what concrete steps are likely to get me into a position where coding Scheme (or some functional language) is the bulk of the work.

I'm actually quite interested in academia, but on the other hand, I don't feel like I necessarily have what it takes (at least not at the moment) to do a top-tier Ph.D in CS. I definitely would prefer to have some real-world experience putting complex systems together in Scheme either way. Does anyone have any advice for an aspiring Schemer?

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Is this question more suited to the programmers stack exchange? –  Andrew Grimm Dec 21 '10 at 6:11
    
you tell me, dog. I asked it before such a thing existed. Maybe I'll go ask it there, too. –  Ben Jan 7 '11 at 15:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Start writing some Scheme libraries, then blog about the libraries you've wrote, get noticed in the community.

This will always give you leverage when applying for a position, employers like to have some evidence of what you can do.

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dalton has the right idea; you want to build something you can show off. To find out about needs, you could go to http://srfi.schemers.org/, which is an archive of proposals for Scheme libraries and other improvements to Scheme, and see what you think you can contribute to. Or make contact with the Racket team; you may be able to contribute to Racket directly.

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1  
This is a great idea- the PLT cats are pretty accessible and genuinely nice people. –  Ben Jul 15 '10 at 16:38

F# is getting popular in the finance sector:

http://cs.hubfs.net/forums/thread/16004.aspx

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Microsoft is right out. –  Ben Jul 16 '10 at 12:47

If you want to leverage something popular and in the news: App Inventor is based on Google Blocks, which are in turn based on Kawa, which is a Scheme dialect [*].

If you can show off your skills by putting together blocks and making them available for the community...it's a natural way to take advantage both of your multi-language skills and something currently getting press coverage.

Regards, Dak [*] and I forgot to say that earlier, mea culpa!

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And Kawa is a dialect of Scheme. gnu.org/software/kawa –  ecounysis Jul 16 '10 at 5:38
    
And App Inventor's a project of one of my Scheme heros, Hal Abeleson... –  Ben Jul 16 '10 at 12:49

Not going to accept my own answer because it is, in general, worse than the one @dalton gave, but!

I got a grant through Turbulence.org to write an art and thus was paid to scheme! Or racket, if you want to be a pedant. repo here...

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