Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an issue in understanding a very simple yet interesting query concerning 2 right outer joins with 'non-sequential' on-expressions. Here is the query:

select * from C 
right outer join A on A.F1 = C.F1 
right outer join B on B.F1 = C.F1;

Here are the tables:

create table A ( F1 varchar(200)); 
create table B ( F1 varchar(200)); 
create table C ( F1 varchar(200));

Here are some rows:

insert into A values ('A'); 
insert into A values ('B');
insert into A values ('C');
insert into B values ('B'); 
insert into B values ('C');
insert into B values ('D');
insert into C values ('A'); 
insert into C values ('C'); 
insert into C values ('D');

Note: The query select * from C right outer join A on A.F1 = C.F1 right outer join B on B.F1 = C.F1; join expressions both refers to table C.

The query returns (in columns then rows)

(NULL,NULL, B),(C, C, C).(NULL, **NULL**, D)

and I expected (in my little understanding of SQL)

(NULL,NULL, B),(C, C, C),(NULL, **D**, D)

What is the logical sequence whereby SQL (tested on Microsoft SQL as well as MySQL) get to these values.

In my "execution" sequence I sit with on table A values of A, null (for B), C, null (for D) and in Table B, null (for A), B, C, D before the "product" is amalgamated with C (B,C,D).

Gawie PS: I have test this using MySQL as well as Microsoft SQL 2008... with the same results.

share|improve this question
    
"Brain no work good sleep without." Ouch, my poor brain. –  George Marian Jul 14 '10 at 21:53
    
Agree, Would've been clearer to name the tables different from the column values. How about T1, T2 and T3. –  Andomar Jul 14 '10 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

There's no D value in table "A" to join to, which is why it returns NULL instead of the D you expect. It's easier to see when you identify which table the value is coming from via column alias:

SELECT c.f1 AS c, a.f1 AS a, b.f1 AS b 
  FROM c 
RIGHT JOIN A on A.F1 = C.F1 
RIGHT JOIN B on B.F1 = C.F1
share|improve this answer
    
Any D value from table C would have to survive the right join to table A –  Andomar Jul 14 '10 at 21:55

Table A doesn't contain a field 'D', so there's no way that D can appear in the second column in the result set, Gawie. The fields in the result set will be C.F1, A.F1, B.F1 (in the same order that the tables appear in the joins).

share|improve this answer

Right joins are evaluated in the order in which they appear (from left to right.) Let's start with from C:

C        -->  (A), (C), (D)

Then right join A, joining on A.F1 = C.F1:

C, A     -->  (A, A), (NULL, B), (C, C)

Then right join B (matching the first column, since the join is on B.F1 = C.F1):

C, A, B  -->  (NULL, NULL, B), (C, C, C), (NULL, NULL, D)

So because from C right join A does not contain an D in the first column, the right join B fails to match, and appends a row containing NULL for the column from C and A, and D for the column from B.

share|improve this answer
    
Order doesn't matter - it's the criteria between the tables. A and B only relate to C, so the query has to return values that exist with respect to C to A or C to B. Hence, C to B with no match in A will return NULL from A –  OMG Ponies Jul 14 '10 at 22:03
    
@OMG Ponies: Order does matter. If you swap the joins, the result will be: (null, null, A), (NULL, NULL, B), (C, C, C) –  Andomar Jul 15 '10 at 5:08

C, A --> (A, A), (NULL, B), (C, C)

Then right join B (matching the first column, since the join is on B.F1 = C.F1):

C, A, B --> (NULL, NULL, B), (C, C, C), (NULL, NULL, D)

This is where I get lost...

Why is C, A, B not equal to (NULL, B, B), ... etc

for C, A for column B equals (NULL, B) right outer join (NULL, B) with B should yield (NULL, B, B)... unless the matching is reversed! C, A, B --> (NULL, B, B) (which is obviously wrong - just don't completely understand why)

share|improve this answer
    
In other words - is the login not [NULL OUTER JOIN B] giving B hence NULL, B, B? –  Gawie Kellerman Jul 15 '10 at 9:59
    
In other words - how does the value of A change when we are joining B and C!? –  Gawie Kellerman Jul 15 '10 at 10:05
    
The reason (NULL, B) is not equal to (B) is that it's matching on the first column, which happens to be NULL. If you change the on condition from B.F1 = C.F1 to B.F1 = A.F1, it would match on the second column. –  Andomar Jul 15 '10 at 17:47
    
Andomar - you're a star!! Thanks. Gawie –  Gawie Kellerman Jul 17 '10 at 7:34
    
Why is it matching on the first column - the SQL reads C right outer join A - which means null right outer join B, which should yield B and not null? –  Gawie Kellerman Jul 18 '10 at 11:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.