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Problem

Frequently (but not every time) when using CVS to check in files like: .java, .cs, .xml, etc, every line of the file is gets a carriage return.

Example:

File before check-in by a team member:

// Begin file
    class Foo
    {
      public Foo()
      {
        // Do step 1
        // Do step 2
      }
    }
// End file

File when checked out by a team member:

// Begin file

    class Foo

    {

      public Foo()

      {

        // Do step 1

        // Do step 2

      }

    }

// End file

Development Environment

  • NetBeans 6.8 and now 6.9 (the problem occurred when using 6.8 as well).
  • Visual Studio 2008 and 2010.
  • Repository: CVS; checkins and checkouts done from Cygwin bash shell.
  • Operating system: Widows XP Professional.

What I Have Tried

I tried changing the value: build.compiler.emacs=true within NetBeans under Tools->Options, thinking this might be causing some kind of Unix/Windows translation problem when checking in? This made no difference.

Am I missing something about what happens to a file when it gets checked into CVS in a Windows/IDE/Cygwin stack that can cause this problem?

Thanks for your help,

-bn

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I've experienced this when using FTP to upload C files, I was uploading using Binary instead of ASCII - is that a configurable option in your situation? –  Danjah Jul 14 '10 at 21:58
    
Looks to be the Line endings. Windows does \r\n where as unix just does one (normally). So unix is converting one Windows Line ending into 2. That said, no idea what part of the process is doing it. You can convert line endings in Windows using notepad++, and view them using a hex editor (NPP has a plugin hex editor). –  DaveShaw Jul 14 '10 at 22:01
    
Standard Unix line-ending character is '\n'; standard Windows line-ending characters are '\r' followed by '\n'. If everything is handled in text mode in C (and CVS is written in C), this doesn't matter. If a text file is handled in binary mode, and there's both Unix and Windows components, there can be problems. –  David Thornley Jul 14 '10 at 22:01
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something is converting DOS line breaks (CR LF) to pairs of Unix line breaks (just LF). I would personally bet on its being CVS. You might want to try using TortoiseCVS instead of Cygwin CVS.

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A Windwos-native CVS client will convert MS-DOS line endings in a text file (\r\n) to Unix-style line endings when submitting the file to the server, so that in the repository, the files are maintained in a 'canonical' form with \n representing a line ending. When Windows native client will also convert the line ending when bringing a file down from the server.

However, I believe that the default Cygwin CVS client acts like a Unix client and assumes that no line ending conversion is required. So if you use that client to check in a file with MS-DOS-style endings (\r\n), you'll get this kind of confusion.

It looks like the people who are using the Cygwin client are using tools that care converting the files to MS-DOS style line endings (or something is).

A potential fix is to uninstall the Cygwin CVS client and install the WinCVS client on your Windows/Cygwin boxes so the Windows native client will be used even when a Cygwin shell is active:

Another possibility to to configure your Cygwin mounts under a specific mode (but I'm not really familiar enough with Cygwin to know how well this works or if it might introduce otehr problems - it's been a long time since I've tried using Cygwin):

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Another possibility that I just ran into - if the file was saved in Unicode format but stored in CVS as ASCII/Text, extra line terminators will be added.

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