Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have this recursion loop where inside the function I have atleast 2 ajax get/post, and the recursion happens after the first ajax get. my function structure is like this,

function Loop() {
    $.get(url, data, function(result) {
        for loop to render the result {
            // render the result here
        }
        for loop to get another data using the result {
            $.post(url, result.data, function(postResult) {
                // I don't know what it did here since 
                // I don't have an access to this post
            });
            // is there a way here that i will not proceed if the post is not done yet?
        }
        setTimeout("", 1000); // I wait for 1 second for the post to finish
        Loop(); // call the recursion
    }, "json");
}

can anyone tell me what's wrong with this code? why do i get a warning from the computer that my script is causing the computer to run slowly. I know that this code is the one causing it, but I don't know the work around.

I know inside the second loop inside the get is causing a lot of memory. Is there a way that it will not loop back if the ajax post is not finished?

share|improve this question
    
setTimeout will not delay the execution of the script at all, you're into a endless loop running it like this –  Rodrigo Jul 15 '10 at 6:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your setTimeout will not neatly pause the code for one second: it will just set a timer for an (empty, in your case) event to go off after a certain time. The rest of the script will continue to execute parallel to that.

So you're currently calling your recursion function a lot more frequently than you think you are. That's your first problem.

Your biggest problem, though, is that regardless of what you're doign in the result of your post, that's in another scope entirely, and you cannot break out of the Loop function from there. There is nothing in your code to break the recursion, so it is infinite, and very fast, and it sends off Ajax requests on top of that.

You need to describe in more detail what you want to achieve, and perhaps somebody can show you how you should do it. The only thing that is certain is that you need to use callbacks. I've written an example but it's making a lot of assumptions. It's a lot of approximations of what I think you might want to achieve, but no doubt you'll need to tweak this a bit to fit your needs. Hopefully it'll give you an idea of the workflow you need to use:

function Loop() {
    $.get(url, data, function(result) {
        for loop to render the result {
            // render the result here
        }

        // this is what you're looping over in your second loop
        var postQueue = result.someArray;

        renderChildData(postQueue, 0);
    }, "json");
}

function renderChildData(array, index) {

   // this is just one item in the loop
   var currentItem = array[index];

   $.post(url, currentItem, function(postResult) {

       // we have received the result for one item
       // render it, and proceed to fetch the next item in the list

       index++;
       if(index < array.length) {
          renderChildData(array, index);
       }

   });
}
share|improve this answer
    
this theory sounds let me try this approach, btw, what i'm trying to achieve here is constantly translating the page since I'm receiving a feed in realtime, and the feed sometimes comes in super fast. but this application only runs in local network. –  rob waminal Jul 15 '10 at 6:48
    
@rob: alright, well as I said you may need to tweak this, but what you can't get away from is that you will not have the linear flow you're used to when you're working with AJAX, so you will have to get used to putting everything that should be done after the AJAX request into the callback (the function you're passing to $.post) –  David Hedlund Jul 15 '10 at 6:55
    
yep! this solves my problem, though as expected, it is not as fast as I wan't it to be but the difference is hard to be noticed. –  rob waminal Jul 15 '10 at 7:03

First of all this line:

   setTimeout("", 1000); // I wait for 1 second for the post to finish

doesn't make your script to wait, since it's improper usage of setTimeout function. I think you should consider to use setInterval instead and do it like:

function Loop() {
    $.get(url, data, function(result) {
        for loop to render the result {
            // render the result here
        }
        for loop to get another data using the result {
            $.post(url, result.data, function(postResult) {
                // I don't know what it did here since 
                // I don't have an access to this post
            });
            // is there a way here that i will not proceed if the post is not done yet?
        }
    }, "json");
}

setInterval( Loop, 1000);

This will make execute your function every 1 sec. I guess this is exactly what you wanted to gain. There is no reason to make recursive call here.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks I solve my first problem, but I got a bigger problem inside the loop, I think what David discuss will help –  rob waminal Jul 15 '10 at 6:44

it basically happen when you use a huge code on a page .. so just try to compress this code

share|improve this answer
1  
compress this while(true) {} –  David Hedlund Jul 15 '10 at 6:40
    
@DavidHedlund jmp short $ –  Cole Johnson Aug 22 '12 at 23:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.