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code sample taken from MSDN

public class Test {
public static void Main() {
  MyBaseClass myBase = new MyBaseClass();
  MyDerivedClass myDerived = new MyDerivedClass();
  object o = myDerived;
  MyBaseClass b = myDerived;

  Console.WriteLine("mybase: Type is {0}", myBase.GetType());
  Console.WriteLine("myDerived: Type is {0}", myDerived.GetType());
  Console.WriteLine("object o = myDerived: Type is {0}", o.GetType());
  Console.WriteLine("MyBaseClass b = myDerived: Type is {0}", b.GetType());   }}

/*
This code produces the following output.
mybase: Type is MyBaseClass
myDerived: Type is MyDerivedClass
object o = myDerived: Type is MyDerivedClass
MyBaseClass b = myDerived: Type is MyDerivedClass 
*/

So would it be logical to make GetType() virtual at least it works as virtual? Can anybody explaine that? And other question Is any other methods in NET framework which have behaviour alike GetType?

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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

because .Net framework does not want you to override the GetType() method and spoof about the type.

assume you can override the method what else would you want it to do other than returning the type of the instance. and when you override the method for each of your classes to return the type of the instance, won't you violate DRY then.

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3  
and reasonably so! –  David Hedlund Jul 15 '10 at 7:27
    
yes. you're right. but you may overload this public method in derived class )) –  Arseny Jul 15 '10 at 7:28
1  
@Arseny: Then it's not the same as GetType() as defined on the Object type. –  this. __curious_geek Jul 15 '10 at 7:29
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GetType returns the actual Type of the object. This allows us to know what object we really got passed to 'our' function. Many methods of the framework need this to determine their own functionality - in most cases to get the Attributes of this class. If the Framework would loose the possibility to determine the real type of an object, the object would loose this type as well.

If you like to know the type used within your method scope - the type you declared or was picked by the compiler - you can add a pretty simple extension method:

public static Type GetCurrentType<T>(this T obj)
{
    return typeof(T);
}

public static void Main()
{
  MyBaseClass myBase = new MyBaseClass();
  MyDerivedClass myDerived = new MyDerivedClass();
  object o = myDerived;
  MyBaseClass b = myDerived;

  Console.WriteLine("mybase: Type is {0}", myBase.GetCurrentType());
  Console.WriteLine("myDerived: Type is {0}", myDerived.GetCurrentType());
  Console.WriteLine("object o = myDerived: Type is {0}", o.GetCurrentType());
  Console.WriteLine("MyBaseClass b = myDerived: Type is {0}", b.GetCurrentType());
}

/*
This code produces the following output.
mybase: Type is ValidatorTest.MyBaseClass
myDerived: Type is ValidatorTest.MyDerivedClass
object o = myDerived: Type is System.Object
MyBaseClass b = myDerived: Type is ValidatorTest.MyBaseClass
*/
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If GetType() was virtual, a class named HumanBeing can override it and return a Type object representing Robot which is called spoofing and preventing this is one of the main features of CLR called Type Safety.

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While its true that you cannot override the object.GetType() method, you can use "new" to overload it completely, thereby spoofing another known type. This is interesting, however, I haven't figured out how to create an instance of the "Type" object from scratch, so the example below pretends to be another type.

public class NotAString
{
    private string m_RealString = string.Empty;
    public new Type GetType()
    {
        return m_RealString.GetType();
    }
}

After creating an instance of this, (new NotAString()).GetType(), will indeed return the type for a string.

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By almost anything that looks at GetType has an instance of object, or at the very least some base type that they control or can reason about. If you already have an instance of the most derived type then there is no need to call GetType on it. The point is as long as someone uses GetType on an object they can be sure it's the system's implementation, not any other custom definition. –  Servy Mar 15 '13 at 18:54
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