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I found following code in one of the frameworks we are using,

if (nValue + 0.01 > nLimit)
   nValue = nValue - 0.01;

if (((nValue+1) / (int)(nValue+1)) == 1)
      sprintf(szValue, "%0.0f", nValue);
   else
      sprintf(szValue, "%0.2f", nValue);

what is the meaning of this code

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closed as not a real question by Philipp, Kirill V. Lyadvinsky, Igor Oks, Martin B, Roger Pate Jul 16 '10 at 4:54

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This must be specific to your framework and requirement. –  ckv Jul 15 '10 at 8:06
    
What is nValue representing? –  detly Jul 15 '10 at 8:22
6  
I hate it when people use floats to represent money... I'd hate to be the guy who gets sued because he still owns €0.01 years after one payment due to obscure roundoff errors... –  Alexandre C. Jul 15 '10 at 8:26
    
@Alexandre, indeed, and this code is a perfect example of the idiotic types of errors that lead to that. Here, there is no code to check that nValue - 0.01 != nValue... And of course (int)(nValue+1) has undefined behavior unless you know nValue+1 fits into an int after rounding. –  R.. Jul 15 '10 at 10:51
2  
To be sure, it was only my guess that we're dealing with money here. The OP gave us no clues. It looks like poorly written code in any case. –  Carl Smotricz Jul 15 '10 at 13:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd suspect that the first part is a mistaken attempt to ensure nValue does not exceed nLimit. It possibly should be

if (nValue + 0.01 > nLimit)
   nValue = nLimit - 0.01;

In other words, if nValue is closer than 0.01 to the limit make it 0.01 less than the limit


To explain how the second part works, it involves dividing a floating point number by the integer part of the number. If the number is an integer then the result will be 1

e.g.

23.00 / 23 = 1 - It's an integer
23.05 / 23 = 1.002 - It's not an integer

Adding 1 to each side is (as ufukgun noticed) to prevent devide by zero, but the devision is redundant as you could simply compare the float with the int

if (nValue == (int)nValue)
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  • Assuming the code is dealing with money amounts stored in floats, the first IF is subtracting 1 cent from nValue if that value exceeds a certain limit. I can't say anything about the purpose without more context.

  • The second chunk deals (awkwardly) with displaying a value without decimal places if it's a straight "Dollar" amount, and other values with two decimal places.

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3  
Presumably the third chunk (not shown) takes the penny from the first chunk and transfers it to the framework developer's retirement fund. –  Mike Seymour Jul 15 '10 at 11:07

The first part tests whether nValue <= (nLimit - 0.01) and then reduces it by 0.01 if this is not the case.

The second part tests to see whether a float value corresponds to an integer and then prints it as an integer if so (e.g. 42), otherwise prints it with two decimal places (e.g. 42.01).

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if (nValue + 0.01 > nLimit)
   nValue = nValue - 0.01;

Without some context it's difficult to understand the purpose of this code. It seems to be trying to ensure that nValue is at least 0.01 less than nLimit, but nValue - 0.01 may still be greater than nLimit and the code doesn't attempt to detect this case. Is nLimit the maximum value of the type? If not, what is it?

if (((nValue+1) / (int)(nValue+1)) == 1)
      sprintf(szValue, "%0.0f", nValue);
   else
      sprintf(szValue, "%0.2f", nValue);

This is trying to work out if nValue is a whole number. If it is a whole number, store just the integer portion of the number as a string. Otherwise store the value with two decimal places.

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ues nLimit is the maximum value of this type, it is less than 100 –  Sirish Jul 15 '10 at 17:10

I think nValue is supposed to be greater than 0.

nValue+1 are used for case nValue == 0


if (((nValue+1) / (int)(nValue+1)) == 1)

means nValue is an integer. (like 45.00)

so developer wanted to print different for cases integer and float.

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I think your first part is wrong, but the second spot on –  David Sykes Jul 15 '10 at 8:17
/* min limit of nValue is nLimit */
if (nValue + 0.01 > nLimit) nValue = nValue - 0.01;

/* if nValue is a round number(no floating point value) or zero eg. 4.00 */
if (((nValue+1) / (int)(nValue+1)) == 1) 

sprintf(szValue, "%0.0f", nValue); 

/* nValue has floating point value eg. 5.002 */
else 
sprintf(szValue, "%0.2f", nValue);

Hope this may help you

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2  
Note that the limiting code is incorrect if that is indeed what it's trying to do. Try nValue = 100.0 and nLimit = 1.0. –  detly Jul 15 '10 at 8:16
    
@delty, you are right, i have make a change. nLimit should be a lowerLimit or threashold, not max –  Sadat Jul 15 '10 at 9:02

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