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Hay, how would i go about rounded a number up the nearest multiple of 3?

ie

25 would return 27
1 would return 3
0 would return 3
6 would return 6

thanks

share|improve this question
11  
0 would return 3???? Why? – Sani Huttunen Jul 15 '10 at 9:11
    
possible duplicate of JQuery: How to round an integer up or down to the nearest 10 – outis Jun 14 '12 at 8:03

10 Answers 10

up vote 44 down vote accepted
    if(n > 0)
        return Math.ceil(n/3.0) * 3;
    else if( n < 0)
        return Math.floor(n/3.0) * 3;
    else
        return 3;
share|improve this answer
    
dont think this would work, would only bring back the same number – RobertPitt Jul 15 '10 at 9:08
    
Why is that? Say we have 7 and we want 9, 7/3=2.33333, ceil(2.3333)=3, 3*3=9. Am I missing something? – Cambium Jul 15 '10 at 9:11
3  
Doesn't work for the OPs requirement for n = 0. – Sani Huttunen Jul 15 '10 at 9:14
4  
It does look like the requirement is wrong, but thats not necessarily for developers to decide. Give the customer what they want, and then charge them through the nose for the subsequent change ;) – PaulJWilliams Jul 15 '10 at 9:18
1  
@PaulJWilliams: but since the customer's requirements are inconsistent with the problem statement, the only possible answer is {25:27,1:3,0:3,6:6}[x]. Even if you ignore the case with x=0, how can -1 round up to -3, if -3 is clearly smaller than -1? The correct answer to the stated problem would be Math.ceil(x/3)*3. – riv Mar 29 '15 at 15:55

Here you are!

Number.prototype.roundTo = function(num) {
    var resto = this%num;
    if (resto <= (num/2)) { 
        return this-resto;
    } else {
        return this+num-resto;
    }
}

Examples:

y = 236.32;
x = y.roundTo(10);

// results in x = 240

y = 236.32;
x = y.roundTo(5);

// results in x = 235
share|improve this answer
1  
Number(1).roundTo(3) returns 0. – OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:26
    
@OrangeDog this is perfect! In your example, 1.6 or more should result in 3. A smaller number will give 0. – Makram Saleh Aug 2 '12 at 8:57
3  
The question specifically says (and gives examples) that all numbers should be rounded up. – OrangeDog Aug 2 '12 at 10:03
    
excelent!! thanks ! – Jorge Olivares Jul 21 '15 at 21:56

Simply:

3.0*Math.round(n/3.0)

?

share|improve this answer
    
Apart from the op's requirement for n = 0, this is should be higher. – KeatsPeeks Sep 4 '15 at 15:15
    
Simpler and better answer than the accepted one. – Martin Dinov Feb 2 at 16:46
    
to comply with the mad requirement, add if (n === 0) return 3 :P – Mizstik Apr 29 at 6:48
    
This rounds either up or down to the nearest multiple instead of always rounding up, or for example 3.0*Math.round(25/3.0) returns 24 instead of 27. – nise Jun 10 at 4:25

This function will round up to the nearest multiple of whatever factor you provide. It will not round up 0 or numbers which are already multiples.

round_up = function(x,factor){ return x - (x%factor) + (x%factor>0 && factor);}

round_up(25,3)
27
round up(1,3)
3
round_up(0,3)
0
round_up(6,3)
6

The behavior for 0 is not what you asked for, but seems more consistent and useful this way. If you did want to round up 0 though, the following function would do that:

round_up = function(x,factor){ return x - (x%factor) + ( (x%factor>0 || x==0) && factor);}

round_up(25,3)
27
round up(1,3)
3
round_up(0,3)
3
round_up(6,3)
6
share|improve this answer

I'm answering this in psuedocode since I program mainly in SystemVerilog and Vera (ASIC HDL). % represents a modulus function.

round_number_up_to_nearest_divisor = number + ((divisor - (number % divisor)) % divisor)

This works in any case.

The modulus of the number calculates the remainder, subtracting that from the divisor results in the number required to get to the next divisor multiple, then the "magic" occurs. You would think that it's good enough to have the single modulus function, but in the case where the number is an exact multiple of the divisor, it calculates an extra multiple. ie, 24 would return 27. The additional modulus protects against this by making the addition 0.

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1  
function roundUpMultiple(num,div) {return num+((div-(num%div))%div)} – Phil Ricketts Feb 5 '14 at 15:59
    
This results in loss of significance for a number that is smaller than 0 but larger than -1, so that for example n=-.1;d=3;n+(d-n%d)%d returns 8.326672684688674e-17. This method can also be used to round a number down (instead of up) to a multiple of d by making d negative, but then it results in loss of significance for a number that is larger than 0 but smaller than 1, so that d=-3;[-3,-1,-.1,0,.1,3].map(function(x){return x+(d-x%d)%d}) returns [-3,-3,-3,0,-8.326672684688674e-17,3]. – nise Jun 16 at 10:09

(n - n mod 3)+3

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1  
javascript's mod operator is %, additionally it will (mistakenly) round up even numbers that are already multiple's of 3.. – Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jul 15 '10 at 9:14
    
I wasnt 100% sure what it was, so just wrote pseudocode.... – PaulJWilliams Jul 15 '10 at 9:15
    
That's how I wanted to post it. I think I'll never answer again on a math question. One little mistake and you get down votes immediately. Worse that in school ;) But hey, at least I was able to get the "peer pressure" badge :) – 2ndkauboy Jul 15 '10 at 9:16
2  
it will change 3 to 6 (and any multiples of 3)... it should not .. – Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jul 15 '10 at 9:18

$(document).ready(function() {
    var modulus = 3;
    for (i=0; i < 21; i++) {
        $("#results").append("<li>" + roundUp(i, modulus) + "</li>")
    }
});


function roundUp(number, modulus) {
    var remainder = number % modulus;
    if (remainder == 0) {
        return number;
    } else {
        return number + modulus - remainder;
    }
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
Round up to nearest multiple of 3:
<ul id="results">
</ul>

share|improve this answer
    
This gives the wrong result for negative numbers. – nise Jun 10 at 5:26

As mentioned in a comment to the accepted answer, you can just use this:

Math.ceil(x/3)*3

(Even though it does not return 3 when x is 0, because that was likely a mistake by the OP.)

Out of the nine answers posted before this one (that have not been deleted or that do not have such a low score that they are not visible to all users), only the ones by Dean Nicholson (excepting the issue with loss of significance) and beauburrier are correct. The accepted answer gives the wrong result for negative numbers and it adds an exception for 0 to account for what was likely a mistake by the OP. Two other answers round a number to the nearest multiple instead of always rounding up, one more gives the wrong result for negative numbers, and three more even give the wrong result for positive numbers.

share|improve this answer
if(x%3==0)
    return x
else
    return ((x/3|0)+1)*3
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't satisfy the (mad) requirement when n == 0. – OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:24
    
This is literally the only correct answer to this question o_O – brandonscript Dec 13 '14 at 1:44
2  
O_o what? x/3|0 is the same as Math.floor(x/3) except 27% slower, according to JSPerf. Also, if x=-4, then it outputs 0, which is clearly incorrect, no matter how you define rounding. – riv Mar 29 '15 at 15:52
(((x - 1) / 3) + 1) * 3

no need to use floating point arithmetics.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's JavaScript, you can't not. – OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:17
    
All this does is add 2 to x, but with rounding errors. – OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:22

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