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Hay, how would i go about rounded a number up the nearest multiple of 3?

ie

25 would return 27
1 would return 3
0 would return 3
6 would return 6

thanks

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4  
0 would return 3???? Why? –  Sani Huttunen Jul 15 '10 at 9:11
    
possible duplicate of JQuery: How to round an integer up or down to the nearest 10 –  outis Jun 14 '12 at 8:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted
    if(n > 0)
        return Math.ceil(n/3.0) * 3;
    else if( n < 0)
        return Math.floor(n/3.0) * 3;
    else
        return 3;
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dont think this would work, would only bring back the same number –  RobertPitt Jul 15 '10 at 9:08
    
Why is that? Say we have 7 and we want 9, 7/3=2.33333, ceil(2.3333)=3, 3*3=9. Am I missing something? –  Cambium Jul 15 '10 at 9:11
    
Cambium is right - it works, because it rounds the n/3 up to the nearest whole number before multiplying by 3 again. –  Jake Jul 15 '10 at 9:12
3  
Doesn't work for the OPs requirement for n = 0. –  Sani Huttunen Jul 15 '10 at 9:14
4  
It does look like the requirement is wrong, but thats not necessarily for developers to decide. Give the customer what they want, and then charge them through the nose for the subsequent change ;) –  PaulJWilliams Jul 15 '10 at 9:18

Here you are!

Number.prototype.roundTo = function(num) {
    var resto = this%num;
    if (resto <= (num/2)) { 
        return this-resto;
    } else {
        return this+num-resto;
    }
}

Examples:

y = 236.32;
x = y.roundTo(10);

// results in x = 240

y = 236.32;
x = y.roundTo(5);

// results in x = 235
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Number(1).roundTo(3) returns 0. –  OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:26
    
@OrangeDog this is perfect! In your example, 1.6 or more should result in 3. A smaller number will give 0. –  Makram Saleh Aug 2 '12 at 8:57
2  
The question specifically says (and gives examples) that all numbers should be rounded up. –  OrangeDog Aug 2 '12 at 10:03

(n - n mod 3)+3

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javascript's mod operator is %, additionally it will (mistakenly) round up even numbers that are already multiple's of 3.. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jul 15 '10 at 9:14
    
I wasnt 100% sure what it was, so just wrote pseudocode.... –  PaulJWilliams Jul 15 '10 at 9:15
    
That's how I wanted to post it. I think I'll never answer again on a math question. One little mistake and you get down votes immediately. Worse that in school ;) But hey, at least I was able to get the "peer pressure" badge :) –  Kau-Boy Jul 15 '10 at 9:16
1  
it will change 3 to 6 (and any multiples of 3)... it should not .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jul 15 '10 at 9:18

This function will round up to the nearest multiple of whatever factor you provide. It will not round up 0 or numbers which are already multiples.

round_up = function(x,factor){ return x - (x%factor) + (x%factor>0 && factor);}

round_up(25,3)
27
round up(1,3)
3
round_up(0,3)
0
round_up(6,3)
6

The behavior for 0 is not what you asked for, but seems more consistent and useful this way. If you did want to round up 0 though, the following function would do that:

round_up = function(x,factor){ return x - (x%factor) + ( (x%factor>0 || x==0) && factor);}

round_up(25,3)
27
round up(1,3)
3
round_up(0,3)
3
round_up(6,3)
6
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I'm answering this in psuedocode since I program mainly in SystemVerilog and Vera (ASIC HDL). % represents a modulus function.

round_number_up_to_nearest_divisor = number + ((divisor - (number % divisor)) % divisor)

This works in any case.

The modulus of the number calculates the remainder, subtracting that from the divisor results in the number required to get to the next divisor multiple, then the "magic" occurs. You would think that it's good enough to have the single modulus function, but in the case where the number is an exact multiple of the divisor, it calculates an extra multiple. ie, 24 would return 27. The additional modulus protects against this by making the addition 0.

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1  
function roundUpMultiple(num,div) {return num+((div-(num%div))%div)} –  Replete Feb 5 at 15:59
if(x%3==0)
    return x
else
    return ((x/3|0)+1)*3
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Doesn't satisfy the (mad) requirement when n == 0. –  OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:24

Simply:

3.0*Math.round(n/3.0)

?

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(((x - 1) / 3) + 1) * 3

no need to use floating point arithmetics.

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1  
It's JavaScript, you can't not. –  OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:17
    
All this does is add 2 to x, but with rounding errors. –  OrangeDog Aug 1 '12 at 18:22

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