Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using reflection to loop through a Type's properties and set certain types to their default. Now, I could do a switch on the type and set the default(Type) explicitly, but I'd rather do it in one line. Is there a programmatic equivalent of default?

share|improve this question
add comment

14 Answers

up vote 283 down vote accepted
  • In case of a value type use Activator.CreateInstance and it should work fine.
  • When using reference type just return null
public static object GetDefault(Type type)
{
   if(type.IsValueType)
   {
      return Activator.CreateInstance(type);
   }
   return null;
}
share|improve this answer
11  
This will return a boxed value type and therefore isn't the exact equivalent of default(Type). However, it's as close as you are going to get without generics. –  Russell Giddings Jul 7 '11 at 14:27
1  
So what? If you find a type which default(T) != (T)(object)default(T) && !(default(T) != default(T)) then you have an argument, otherwise it does not matter whether it is boxed or not, since they are equivalent. –  Miguel Angelo Oct 11 '12 at 6:14
3  
The last piece of the predicate is to avoid cheating with operator overloading... one could make default(T) != default(T) return false, and that is cheating! =) –  Miguel Angelo Oct 11 '12 at 6:16
3  
This helped me a lot, but I thought I should add one thing that might be useful to some people searching this question - there's also an equivalent method if you wanted an array of the given type, and you can get it by using Array.CreateInstance(type, length). –  Darrel Hoffman Jun 30 '13 at 1:34
3  
Don't you worry about creating an instance of an unknown value type? This may have collateral effects. –  ygormutti Oct 14 '13 at 9:08
show 2 more comments

Why not call the method that returns default(T) with reflection ? You can use GetDefault of any type with:

    public object GetDefault(Type t)
    {
        return this.GetType().GetMethod("GetDefaultGeneric").MakeGenericMethod(t).Invoke(this, null);
    }

    public T GetDefaultGeneric<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
This is brilliant because it's so simple. While it's not the best solution here, it's an important solution to keep in mind because this technique can be useful in a lot of similar circumstances. –  configurator Feb 17 '13 at 12:45
    
If you call the generic method "GetDefault" instead (overloading), do this: this.GetType().GetMethod("GetDefault", new Type[0]).<AS_IS> –  Quandary May 7 '13 at 10:50
add comment

You can use PropertyInfo.SetValue(obj, null). If called on a value type it will give you the default. I'm not sure if this is documented in the CLR spec.

share|improve this answer
3  
This only works if you have a property you want to fill? –  McKay Oct 15 '12 at 17:52
2  
For this specific question - looping trough a type's properties AND setting them to "default" - this works brilliantly. I use it when converting from a SqlDataReader to an object using reflection. –  Volkirith Jun 23 '13 at 9:13
    
This behavior is documented in .NET 4.5, but not before. –  0xF May 15 at 13:28
add comment

If you're using .NET 4.0 or above and you want a programmatic version that isn't a codification of rules defined outside of code, you can create an Expression, compile and run it on-the-fly.

The following extension method will take a Type and get the value returned from default(T) through the Default method on the Expression class:

public static T GetDefaultValue<T>()
{
    // We want an Func<T> which returns the default.
    // Create that expression here.
    Expression<Func<T>> e = Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(
        // The default value, always get what the *code* tells us.
        Expression.Default(typeof(T))
    );

    // Compile and return the value.
    return e.Compile()();
}

public static object GetDefaultValue(this Type type)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    if (type == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("type");

    // We want an Func<object> which returns the default.
    // Create that expression here.
    Expression<Func<object>> e = Expression.Lambda<Func<object>>(
        // Have to convert to object.
        Expression.Convert(
            // The default value, always get what the *code* tells us.
            Expression.Default(type), typeof(object)
        )
    );

    // Compile and return the value.
    return e.Compile()();
}

You could also cache the above value based on the Type, but it might not be good generally; if you're calling this for a large number of Type instances, and don't use it constantly, the memory consumed by the cache might outweigh the benefits.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is brilliant. I'm always wary of that Activator thing. Thanks. –  Jordan Mar 30 at 3:37
add comment

The chosen answer is a good answer, but be careful with the object returned.

string test = null;
string test2 = "";
if (test is string)
     Console.WriteLine("This will never be hit.");
if (test2 is string)
     Console.WriteLine("Always hit.");

Extrapolating...

string test = GetDefault(typeof(string));
if (test is string)
     Console.WriteLine("This will never be hit.");
share|improve this answer
7  
true, but that holds for default(string) as well, as every other reference type... –  TDaver Jan 21 '11 at 14:12
    
string is an odd bird - being a value type that can return null as well. If you want the code to return string.empty just add a special case for it –  Dror Helper Jul 7 '11 at 7:09
7  
@Dror - string is an immutable reference type, not a value type. –  ljs Aug 18 '11 at 16:01
    
@kronoz You're right - I meant that string can be handled by returning string.empty or null according to need. –  Dror Helper Aug 21 '11 at 6:40
add comment

This is optimized Flem's solution:

using System.Collections.Concurrent;

namespace System
{
    public static class TypeExtension
    {
        //a thread-safe way to hold default instances created at run-time
        private static ConcurrentDictionary<Type, object> typeDefaults = new ConcurrentDictionary<Type, object>();

        public static object GetDefaultValue(this Type type)
        {
            return type.IsValueType ? typeDefaults.GetOrAdd(type, t => Activator.CreateInstance(t)) : null;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
A short hand version of the return: return type.IsValueType ? typeDefaults.GetOrAdd(type, Activator.CreateInstance) : null; –  Mark Whitfeld Jan 23 '13 at 14:08
add comment

Why do you say generics are out of the picture?

    public static object GetDefault(Type t)
    {
        Func<object> f = GetDefault<object>;
        return f.Method.GetGenericMethodDefinition().MakeGenericMethod(t).Invoke(null, null);
    }

    private static T GetDefault<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... Let me try that when I get back to the office. I may not have to go through all the trouble I have so far. –  Berin Loritsch Oct 26 '10 at 21:18
1  
If only I knew this existed sooner. Having come from a Java background, I didn't even consider this possible (Java's Generic support is broken and has minimal reflection help). –  Berin Loritsch Oct 27 '10 at 12:25
1  
No magic strings needed to find the generic method. Nice! –  Sphinxxx Apr 8 at 7:54
    
Cannot resolve symbol Method. Using a PCL for Windows. –  Cœur Jun 14 at 13:43
add comment

The Expressions can help here:

    private static Dictionary<Type, Delegate> lambdasMap = new Dictionary<Type, Delegate>();

    private object GetTypedNull(Type type)
    {
        Delegate func;
        if (!lambdasMap.TryGetValue(type, out func))
        {
            var body = Expression.Default(type);
            var lambda = Expression.Lambda(body);
            func = lambda.Compile();
            lambdasMap[type] = func;
        }
        return func.DynamicInvoke();
    }

I did not test this snippet, but i think it should produce "typed" nulls for reference types..

share|improve this answer
add comment

Can't find anything simple and elegant just yet, but I have one idea: If you know the type of the property you wish to set, you can write your own default(T). There are two cases - T is a value type, and T is a reference type. You can see this by checking T.IsValueType. If T is a reference type, then you can simply set it to null. If T is a value type, then it will have a default parameterless constructor that you can call to get a "blank" value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I do the same task like this.

//in MessageHeader 
   private void SetValuesDefault()
   {
        MessageHeader header = this;             
        Framework.ObjectPropertyHelper.SetPropertiesToDefault<MessageHeader>(this);
   }

//in ObjectPropertyHelper
   public static void SetPropertiesToDefault<T>(T obj) 
   {
            Type objectType = typeof(T);

            System.Reflection.PropertyInfo [] props = objectType.GetProperties();

            foreach (System.Reflection.PropertyInfo property in props)
            {
                if (property.CanWrite)
                {
                    string propertyName = property.Name;
                    Type propertyType = property.PropertyType;

                    object value = TypeHelper.DefaultForType(propertyType);
                    property.SetValue(obj, value, null);
                }
            }
    }

//in TypeHelper
    public static object DefaultForType(Type targetType)
    {
        return targetType.IsValueType ? Activator.CreateInstance(targetType) : null;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Equivalent to Dror's answer but as an extension method:

namespace System
{
    public static class TypeExtensions
    {
        public static object Default(this Type type)
        {
            object output = null;

            if (type.IsValueType)
            {
                output = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
            }

            return output;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

From my answer here:

Yet another alternative - checks for nullability beforehand for nullable structs:

public static object GetDefaultValue(this Type t)
{
    if (!t.IsValueType || Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t) != null)
        return null;

    return Activator.CreateInstance(t);
}
share|improve this answer
    
If it's a Nullable<T>, CreateInstance() would produce null. So is this check really necessary? It adds an operation for all non Nullable<T> value types. –  Cœur Jun 16 at 0:23
    
@Cœur It's not necessary to produce the correct result. Among the scores of answers here, I presented a slightly different one, that's all. As for performance, I'm not sure, one will have to benchmark it, but my money is on the accepted answer (your idea in comment). –  nawfal Jun 16 at 4:24
add comment
 /// <summary>
    /// returns the default value of a specified type
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    public static object GetDefault(this Type type)
    {
        return type.IsValueType ? (!type.IsGenericType ? Activator.CreateInstance(type) : type.GenericTypeArguments[0].GetDefault() ) : null;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work for Nullable<T> types: it doesn't return the equivalent of default(Nullable<T>) which should be null. Accepted answer by Dror works better. –  Cœur Jun 16 at 0:11
add comment

A potentially simpler solution might be to use a generic extension method

public static object GetDefault<T>(this T type) where T : Type
{
    return default(T);
}

Edit: I just noticed http://stackoverflow.com/a/4027869/948395 already posted a similar solution, but theirs does not take the type parameter which means it is more complicated to call.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure this works. typeof(int).GetDefault() will return null rather than 0. That is because you're getting the default of T which is of type Type, rather than than the actual Type passed in. –  Werner Strydom Sep 10 '13 at 23:27
    
I think this will always return null since default(Type) is null. –  Sam Jan 13 at 23:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.