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I was asked the following question in an interview:

Is there any way in which Fibonacci series can be generated using only 1 variable ?

I didn't know what to answer. What should I have said?

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2  
This recursive solution just uses one single variable. That's what you want? –  Andreas_D Jul 15 '10 at 11:31
    
You are probably going to have to be more specific. What is the purpose of this variable? An initial value, or the nth number in the series? –  Quick Joe Smith Jul 15 '10 at 11:32
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11 Answers 11

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Yes, you can used the closed-form expression:

where

You can calculate the expression using a double and round the result to the nearest integer. Because of the finite precision of floating point arithmetic this formula will give a wrong answer for large enough n, but I think it will work in the case when the result fits into a Java 32-bit integer.

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Showoff :-----) –  Esko Jul 15 '10 at 11:35
    
+1 for magical math :D –  pablochan Jul 15 '10 at 11:37
2  
@kantu: an explanation of this formula would belong in mathoverflow instead. –  polygenelubricants Jul 15 '10 at 11:40
1  
@kantu: the link leads to wikipedia explaining it, or look at my answer. (which uses the same math, but with a formula less intimidating) –  Daniel Martin Jul 15 '10 at 11:44
    
@polygenelubricants: An explanation of this formula is too basic for mathoverflow. –  Aryabhatta Jul 18 '10 at 17:36
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Up to a point, yes (though in C, you could convert it to Java - it would look much uglier).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main (void) {
    unsigned long i = 1;
    printf ("0\n");
    while (((i & 0xffff0000) >> 16) + (i & 0xffff) <= 0xffff) {
        printf ("%d\n", i & 0xffff);
        i = ((i & 0xffff) << 16) | ((i >> 16) + (i & 0xffff));
    }
    return 0;
}

which produces:

0
1
1
2
3
5
8
13
21
34
55
89
144
233
377
610
987
1597
2584
4181
6765
10946
17711
28657

:-)

The real question, of course, is: Why would you want to?

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WoW :-)......... –  Prasoon Saurav Jul 15 '10 at 11:51
    
I will have to find a datatype with size = 8 Bytes to generate Fibonacci for an int :).. –  Aamir Jul 15 '10 at 12:30
    
@Aamir, just use a struct with as many fields as you want, or even an array of two ints). That's still technically declaring one variable :-) –  paxdiablo Jul 16 '10 at 1:59
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Sure, using recursion:

public class Test {

    public static int fib(int n) {
        return n < 2 ? n : fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for(int i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
            System.out.print(fib(i)+", ");
        }
        System.out.println("...");
    }
}

// 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, ...
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2  
I was posting the same code... if it's for a homework (pure theory), it's ok, but I wouldn't use exponential recursion in production code. :-) –  G B Jul 15 '10 at 11:34
    
can it be done without using recursion ? i was asked this in an interview today and was dumb struck came home and did some googling but couldnt find anything like that –  GoodSp33d Jul 15 '10 at 11:36
2  
@G B: I wouldn't know in what production code one needs to calculate the Fibonacci sequence! :) –  Bart Kiers Jul 15 '10 at 11:36
    
@kantu, checkout @Mark Byers' answer. Besides, did the interviewer said you couldn't make use of recursion? If so, please include that in your original question. –  Bart Kiers Jul 15 '10 at 11:36
    
@Bart K.: I would say a recursive version uses at least one variable for each level of recursion (not to mention all the other registers stacked). The only approach which really only uses one variable would be to convert n to F(n) by multiplying by ln(phi) and taking exp(n), and rounding/tweaking suitably, outputting the value, and then converting F(n) to n by taking ln(F), multiplying by 1/ln(phi), applying a suitable rounding tweak, and then adding 1. Seems more practical to just use three variables, though. –  supercat Jul 15 '10 at 14:56
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Yes, but you still need to remember 2 values. You could take a 64-bit variable and use it as 2 32-bit vars.

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can we do it without using Recursion ? –  GoodSp33d Jul 15 '10 at 11:35
2  
My answer doesn't use recursion. –  pablochan Jul 15 '10 at 11:36
2  
Your answer has also twisted the definition of 'one variable'. Multiplexing two values into a block of memory that you happen to have only have one explicit pointer to isn't precisely 'one' variable, any more than an array is 'one' variable. But given how tricksy the question is in the first place, perhaps your solution would have been a good place to start a conversation. –  Alex Feinman Jul 15 '10 at 14:33
1  
What about the whole stack of variables the recursive solution uses ;] ? –  pablochan Jul 16 '10 at 19:04
    
@Alex, Using recusion also twists the defintion of one variable as it keeps the value of the Left Hand Side fib while it calculates the Right Hand Side fib value. There is actually a saved value for each level of recusion. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 17 '10 at 7:37
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The answer is "yes", but maybe you could be more specific.

The first example I could think of, using double recursion (that leads to an exponential complexity, not recommended):

int fib(int a) {
  if (a < 2) {
    return 1
  } else {
    return fib(a-1) + fib(a-2);
  }
}

Assuming a >= 0 (you could add a check for that).

(Edit - used the wrong convention of F(0) undefined, F(1) = 1)

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After the initial 1 1, it is in theory possible to generate one value from the previous one (until machine precision comes around to bite you) via:

f = Math.round(f * PHI)

where PHI is the constant defined in another comment:

static final double PHI = (1 + Math.sqrt(5))/2;

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You can always do something like this:

    String theOneVar = "100;0;1";
    while (true) {
        if (theOneVar.split(";")[0].equals("0")) break;
        System.out.println(theOneVar.split(";")[1]);
        theOneVar = String.format("%s;%s;%s",
            Integer.parseInt(theOneVar.split(";")[0]) - 1,
            theOneVar.split(";")[2],
            new BigInteger(theOneVar.split(";")[1]).add(
                new BigInteger(theOneVar.split(";")[2])
            )
        );
    }

This prints (as seen on ideone.com):

0
1
1
2
3
5
8
13
:
:
83621143489848422977
135301852344706746049
218922995834555169026

This uses only one explicit variable, and it's essentially a linear non-recursive algorithm. It needs to be said that this is an abuse of String, though.

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1  
Ach mein Gott! I'm going to vote this up just because it gave me a headache :-) –  paxdiablo Jul 15 '10 at 12:08
    
@paxdiablo: I believe others have suggested this, and I haven't carefully examined your answer to see if it's essentially the same, but basically the "one variable" notion is abused to essentially store multiple things. I think someone mentioned two 32-bit numbers in a 64-bit variable, etc. Here we essentially have "int;BigInteger;BigInteger" in a String. –  polygenelubricants Jul 15 '10 at 12:27
1  
Creative solution! :-) –  Jesper Jul 15 '10 at 12:35
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So this is evil, but:

static String fibRecord = "x;";

static int nextFib() {
  try {
    return fibRecord.indexOf(';');
  } finally {
    fibRecord = fibRecord.replaceAll("(x*);(x*)", "$1$2;$1");
  }
}

public static void main(String[] ignored) {
  for (int i=0; i < 30; i++) {
    System.out.println(nextFib());
  }
}

My machine here starts to fall over around the 38th Fibonacci number.

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+1; evil GENIUS that is... –  polygenelubricants Jul 18 '10 at 19:49
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Here's an example in C#. Shows the first 100 terms. The ratio between terms in the Fibonacci approaches the golden ratio (1.618033...), so a single variable approach simply requires a multiplication by a constant for each term.

Yay math!

double fib = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("" + fib);
    fib = Math.Round(fib *= 1.6180339887d);
}
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Except you need to add an extra WriteLine outside the loop to write the first "1" since the series usually begins with 1, 1, 2, 3, ... –  Daniel Martin Jul 15 '10 at 22:20
    
Yep, you could hard code that in for properness. Also, I guess the index variable "i" also counts as a variable, so that's cheating. You could however use a while loop instead and test that "fib" is lower than a certain value. –  Andy Holt Jul 16 '10 at 8:57
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class fibo{

public static void main (String args[]) {

long i = 1;
  while (((i & 0xffff0000) >> 16) + (i & 0xffff) <= 0xffff) {
     System.out.println(i & 0xffff);
    i = ((i & 0xffff) << 16) | ((i >> 16) + (i & 0xffff));
}

} }

Here is the java code of Fibonacci series using one variable.

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THE PROGRAM IS FOR PRINTING UP TO 10 NUMBER BUT YOU CAN CHANGE IT.

import java. i o.*;

class q
{

public static void main()throws IO Exception

{

int n=0;

for(int i=1; i<=10 ; i++)

 {

  System.out.print(n +" ");

  n=(int)Math.round(n*1.618)

  }

}

}


1.618 = PHI

the program has some mistakes in import and in main statement but the body is full correct

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